1

COMMENT 9d ago

For all the proletariat wannabes in this thread:

You can go form a corporation in the U.S. version of Ugland House. Like, right now. For like, a few hundred bucks. You don’t even need a lawyer. There are literally instructions and template forms on the website of the state of Delaware.

And you can appoint a registered representative to handle the receipt of legal docs, payment of state franchise tax, etc..

Wow, so ~scandalous~ /s

1

COMMENT 9d ago

ITT: people who don’t understand basic corporate law dishing out garbo hot takes a la Bernie.

Guess we should have 18,000 separate addresses for those companies, right? Where service of process can take place?

People constantly dredge up this obscure part of international corporate plumbing as if it’s a smoking gun. Go find the Wikipedia for “Service Company” and educate yourself instead of feeling the bern.

-4

COMMENT 9d ago

Hold up…people on this sub are always bitching about not getting the time of day from recruiters and hiring managers. Now there’s a post of some manager going out of their way to conduct the interview in a way that results in an offer and you’re upset?

Like yeah, the post is gushy, annoying LinkedIn clickbait, but…kinda seems whiny and tone deaf

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COMMENT 13d ago

I almost fell out of my fucking chair 40 seconds from the end when Stern jumps on the beat

1

COMMENT 27d ago

Just curious, what was wrong with the Zephyrii? I just got one and it’s been great so far.

-4

COMMENT May 04 '21

Failed pseudo-capitalist countries like the US

Lul

1

COMMENT Apr 16 '21

It’s tied to a string...

1

COMMENT Apr 16 '21

Literally lmao

1

COMMENT Apr 16 '21

...we not gonna talk about how her first reaction was to hide behind her bf and try to redirect the snake to him?

1

COMMENT Apr 16 '21

“Each minute, 10,000 DOGE have to be bought to keep it at the same price”

That’s not how that works...

1

COMMENT Apr 11 '21

You don’t know what you’re talking about

1

COMMENT Apr 11 '21

Tale as old as time...see you when the cycle turns

1

COMMENT Apr 10 '21

ITT: people who bought expensive rings, probably for the wrong reasons, and are being ugly about it

Also ITT: people who proposed with ring pops and are doling out laughably bad life advice very confidently, probably to mask their insecurity

2

COMMENT Apr 03 '21

Stay strong man. There’s no way around it, so try to embrace that you are destined to go through it instead.

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COMMENT Apr 03 '21

When my dad died young and unexpectedly, in my mid-twenties.

The end is coming for each of us - for some of us, it will arrive surprisingly soon. Hard as I tried to re-submerge myself in the same old idle distractions which used to occupy my youthful days, I never recaptured the carefree feeling I once had. It has been replaced by the faint but inexorable ticking of a clock that I cannot see, which lurks in the background of every idle moment. I lost my ability to ignore it, and since realizing I cannot escape it, I have become hell-bent on ensuring that my time is not squandered before it is up.

1

COMMENT Apr 01 '21

Not familiar with the schools here but don’t listen to the people in this thread saying “it doesn’t matter where you go to undergrad”. Where you go to undergrad is arguably the most important thing for increasing your odds of success in IB recruiting. The guy saying IBs look for masters and PhDs (lol) is also wrong

-1

COMMENT Mar 20 '21

Rather bold of you to truly believe that your reductive pseudo-logical analysis is a particularly strong take on “why does banking work this way”. Venture to guess you’re an engineer?

Hey - did you know that the jobs you just implied were “easy” routinely receive tens of thousands of applications annually for ~20-100 slots at each bank? Look, I can also present sloppy analysis in a vacuum as if it were fact!

You’ve already admitted elsewhere that you don’t work in this industry, and it’s clear that you don’t care much for it. How about you stick to what you know going forwards, as it’s clear to the informed observer you don’t know much about this.

-1

COMMENT Mar 20 '21

I revised my comment to avoid this confrontation but sorry to see you were too quick on the trigger for me. I’ll bite. Usually, people who aren’t salty don’t have so much to say about things they know nothing about (in this case, your comments about what is best for the wellbeing of investment banks). But hey, live and let live. It doesn’t really matter, does it?

1

COMMENT Mar 20 '21

This is another bad hot take. It is true that there are tons of great non-target analysts on the street. But having interviewed tons of candidates, you are tripping if you think a random sample from big state school will be of the same caliber as a random sample from the ivies. Even so, many banks now make a concerted effort to recruit at all manner of schools, so your critique is really moot.

Let’s recall that as the article states, the interviewers from these banks work 80 hours a week minimum regularly on their actual deals. They don’t have time to sift for diamonds in the rough just because it satisfies your sense of what is right and wrong. Hiring is a constrained optimization problem and the filters are there to achieve a (very high) modicum of candidate quality in the shortest amount of time possible.

You have a lot of proclamations to make for someone apparently not in the industry. Why so sensitive?

-1

COMMENT Mar 19 '21

This is a bad hot take.

0

COMMENT Mar 19 '21

These sensational articles written by click farmers always get a lot of shock reactions and hot takes, but for any analysts tuning in from the trenches out there here are my candid thoughts:

Keep your head up. Don’t listen to everyone in this thread telling you whether you made the right choice or not, and especially don’t listen to the ones who have no idea what it’s like to get your seat or hold on to it for dear life, yet confidently pass judgment on your life and your decisions. Just try to do your best work under this duress, know your limits (physical and mental, a job is not worth everything), and don’t take it personally when you are caught up in the currents of these busy times and things don’t break your way - at some point or another, it happens to us all. Don’t feel like you have to force yourself to do this if your heart isn’t really in it (and you will know deep down whether it is). It is a great career but if it doesn’t feel great to you and if you can’t make it work with your family and broader life, just try to stick it out through your two year program if you can. Lots of doors will open to you if you can hold on for now.

Best of luck guys and gals. I know how rough it is at the moment with WFH, but truth be told it always is, always has been and always will be. It’s an apprenticeship model at the end of the day, and apprentices have always gotten the shitty end of the stick since the advent of the guild system. In my experience it only gets better from where you are now, try to remember that. Don’t forget that this is a game which takes your passion and youthful energy up front and rewards you for it in spades later on.

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COMMENT Mar 08 '21

I think if you read my post again you will see that I do not disagree with you. I am not laboring 100 hours a week in my corporate job under the illusion that the hours put in make me a remarkable person. There are many more janitors and servers and laborers in the world working my hours than there are doctors and lawyers and Indian chiefs. American culture is very work-centric and venerates the successful in part by implicitly questioning the merit of those who don’t find wild success. But I believe that there is very basic and important dignity in the work of “unskilled” laborers who put in the full measure of my hours without the expectation of nearly as much remuneration. I do not think everyone can or should be a corporate high flyer, in part for the reasons you stated. I do not believe anyone is “less than” just because their hundred hours consists of clogged toilets and mine consists of cubicles and boardrooms. I think a just world is one that would recognize we are each in this together, and need one another in different ways. Most importantly, I believe that everyone who is willing to do an honest day’s work should be able to live with the dignity that they are due in exchange for their efforts.

1

COMMENT Mar 08 '21

I’m not in a position to answer that in a capital-c “Correct” way. All I can speak to is my experience.

What it meant for me was:

-working harder than frankly anyone I knew personally in my peer group once I did realize I had missed the boat (I do not wear this as a badge of honor, it was isolating and difficult and I missed out on some things you can’t go back to)

-making sacrifices large enough that the reward I was seeking did not always seem commensurate with what it cost me

  • believing in my dream past the point that rationality and risk-adjusted calculus would say I should

  • getting told no a lot, sometimes in ways that were quite painful and humbling

-being fortunate enough to be truly passionate about the object of my professional desire in a way that surpasses dollars and cents.

  • above all else, meeting with one stroke of luck after a few years, wherein I was given the chance to gamble my meager savings on bad odds that my dream would be realized, and it worked out. Yes, I set myself up for the opportunity to come, and yes it didn’t just show up out of the blue, and yes when this opportunity arose I had been positioning myself appropriately for years. But I am not kidding myself that I could have planned for exactly how it happened, or that it is a formula based on grit and bootstraps that I can point to for others. These things are necessary but not sufficient, and ultimately luck was on my side, for which I will remain forever greatful.

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COMMENT Mar 08 '21

Not a lawyer and for my anonymity do not want to explain my bona fides (sorry), but suffice to say that this perspective is informed by a lot of personal/professional experience with the business of lawyering and a lot of close personal and professional interaction with the top lawyers of the top firms of the AmLaw 10 / 25, from associate to partner.

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COMMENT Mar 08 '21

Glad at least one person enjoyed it. The only other thing I’ll add which didn’t fit in the original:

The senior-level people that have the jobs OP claims to want (read: lucrative, stimulating) are more often than not fundamentally survivors by trade, who claw their way out of difficult and adversarial situations for a living. Dealing with a lot of (unfair, stressful) shit while maintaining a smile constantly is one of the main parts of the job. OP has stated elsewhere in the thread that she essentially wants to become a biglaw partner - among all the professions, she should know that for all they are paid (which is less than she thinks they are), biglaw partners take the most shit, and get the least thanks, and if she doesn’t genuinely thrive on the adrenaline of the day to day struggle/thinks the money will be enough to make it worthwhile, I strongly suggest she reconsider. When you have spent more than 100 hours a week staring at your screen for weeks on end (which will happen to you in biglaw and elsewhere), no amount of money in the world is enough on its own to really make you feel that it was worthwhile. If I asked you to put a price on the hours in your life, how many zeroes would it take for our bargain to seem fair? For most people, such a number doesn’t exist, and those that do it just for the money often have the realization that the bargain was raw only once they’re in too deep to just leave, having invested lots of money and their youth itself in the pursuit of something they come to regard as hollow. If you don’t have actual passion for the business of lawyering to fall back on in the tough moments, you run the risk of making what is already a long, hard, thankless and risky slog into something completely soul-crushing and unbearable.