r/todayilearned 8d ago

TIL that the last surviving wife of a Civil War veteran died just 6 months ago. They married in 1936 while she was 17 and he was 93. This practice was common so that young women could receive the veteran's Civil War pension ($73.13/month). She died in December 2020 at the age of 101. R1/R5

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/last-surviving-widow-civil-war-veteran-dies-101-180976702/
22k Upvotes

3k

u/yellehs4u 8d ago

She never claimed the pension

2k

u/vakula 8d ago

More specifically, she was blackmailed so she couldn't do it.

821

u/WittyWitWitt 8d ago

What's this?

1k

u/Nakedwitch58 8d ago

His daughters were pissed at her. They were going to spread talk of her being a little slut if she collected

4k

u/SuccinctSavage 8d ago

If someone wants to pay me a monthly subscription fee to call me a dirty little slut, please do not hesitate.

724

u/Banc0 8d ago

Do you do a la carte? I might could swing a dirty little slut or two but a subscription just seems irresponsible in this economic climate.

376

u/Einsteins_coffee_mug 8d ago

I’m so sick of everything being a monthly payment.

Can’t I just pay like $50 up front one time? I know I’m going to use it twice, maybe thrice, and then forget I every signed up.

258

u/TinKicker 8d ago

“Thou art thrice a slut, I say!”

45

u/throw-it-away-plus-u 8d ago

not four nor two but thrice!

36

u/Icy-Secret-42 8d ago

Five is right out.

→ More replies

42

u/Puntius_Pilate 8d ago

The sting of thrice is felt most acutely and efficiently, more so than the somewhat numbed fourth, and more than the built accumulation of the two.

→ More replies

4

u/zyzzogeton 8d ago

Nay! The song doth say "Three times a lady". But forsooth: two brace times a strumpet.

2

u/TheGlaive 8d ago

Once. Twice. Three times a dirt slut.

→ More replies

29

u/darkadamski1 8d ago

The market wants monthly payments and the companies make way more with it. I’ve been using Spotify for 8 years now, that’s £13 a month, total of around 1200. If someone told me if would cost that much at the start then I would have never paid for it. The companies are minting it from these monthly payments cause they look so much smaller than they are

5

u/HOT_MOLDY_CUM_BREATH 8d ago

I probably spent that much if not more on tapes/CDs in the long ago

3

u/Variability 8d ago

Having been a pirate for ages, music is one thing I'd happily pay for ease and convenience.

Your catalog always gets updated, all in one place, and it's easily accessible anytime. I pay $32 CAD yearly. Get a family plan and split it with people.

→ More replies
→ More replies

70

u/3ddyLos 8d ago

That's the point. They're trying to capitalize on ppl forgetting.

22

u/Sqee 8d ago

I will never forget to call you a dirty little slut.

→ More replies

5

u/_ZoeyDaveChapelle_ 8d ago

I pay an added ADHD tax. It's 400% higher than the average loss.

→ More replies

7

u/egnards 8d ago

Smartphones are a god send -

*sign up for service\*

*"Siri, remind me in 5 days to cancel XYZ"

17

u/SonOfTK421 8d ago

Some of this stuff doesn’t even make sense. Every month, I pay $29.99 for unlimited car washes. I use it like four or five times a week, which can’t be cost-effective for the company. The regular washes are between $13 and $19 a pop anyway. They must be making money hand over fist on those and the people who come rarely, if ever, to use their subscription. It’s still a weird system.

28

u/clementleopold 8d ago

5 washes a week? You’re going to scrub the paint off your ride!

17

u/conlius 8d ago

He might paint his car once a week too. You never know!

→ More replies

14

u/PM_me_Henrika 8d ago

He said he uses it, not his car.

Guy’s a toughie.

→ More replies
→ More replies

8

u/leftunderground 8d ago

How do you have that much time? And as mentioned above you're destroying the paint on your car.

15

u/carnivorous_seahorse 8d ago

Not just that, why would you ever need to wash it 5 times a week lmao? Is homie just flying down dirt roads 24/7?

→ More replies

11

u/SonOfTK421 8d ago

So point by point: I spend anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes a week at the car wash, so that’s really not an issue at all.

Secondly, everything damages your car’s paint. Bird poop, rain if it’s acidic, dirt, rain if it mixes with dirt, bugs, road salt, gasoline, the sun. Washing it, at minimum, reduces these risks. And of course if you wax it, you can minimize the risk as well. So…yeah I’m gonna go ahead and do me on this one. My car’s paint looks fine.

→ More replies
→ More replies

3

u/Rowf 8d ago

Own a car dealership?

3

u/SonOfTK421 8d ago

Are you asking if I do or suggesting I should?

→ More replies

3

u/TheRealKidkudi 8d ago

A car wash near me does the same. It’s a sweet deal for people like you who use it all the time, but there’s probably plenty of people who use it just often enough to be worth it for them - 2 or 3 times a month, based on your regular wash price - but still not often enough that they lose money. And I’m sure there’s plenty of people who pay for it every month and only go once and don’t cancel because of the convenience.

Monthly subscriptions are great for businesses because it’s money they know they’re getting every month, and as long as they price it more than the cost to serve the average subscriber they are making money. Add on to it the number of people who forget to cancel or who don’t make it past the hurdles to do so and it’s a great way to pad their profit.

→ More replies

5

u/DrSkeletonHand_MD 8d ago

You wash your car 5 times a week? Do you live under a flock of birds?

→ More replies

2

u/Megneous 8d ago

Um... I don't think that's good for your car.

But anyway, it's the same idea as with buffets. Some people, like you, use the service too much and cause them to lose money. However, most people pay, but get far less out of the service than they pay in due to not using the service enough (not eating enough at the buffet). So overall, the owner profits despite people like you in the minority.

→ More replies
→ More replies

70

u/InfiniteRepair 8d ago

You can berate me for $10.99 a session. If you get 10 sessions in a quarter, the 11th is free!

If I cry, there is an upcharge. Same if you want me to insult you back.

9

u/UNWS 8d ago

This intrigues me, I would like to sign up for your newsletter :D

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

95

u/StockCurious 8d ago

Sign me up, I'll take double.

103

u/brazzy42 8d ago

Something tells me that this was a lot more serious a problem in 1936.

13

u/MyNameCannotBeSpoken 8d ago

Don't today's veterans still get pensions? Maybe today's women aren't aware of this.

16

u/sdiss98 8d ago

The pension was replaced with a 401k but a lot of folks were grandfathered in. A version of this story is still pretty rampant in the navy where you will find young sailors getting married to women that are after their benefits. It’s not uncommon for navy ships to pull into a foreign port for a weekend and a sailor get bequeathed to a local that doesn’t even speak the same language. I’ve also seen you g sailors get married in order to get to move out of the barracks.

15

u/MyNameCannotBeSpoken 8d ago

I think those women are more interested in visas than pensions

→ More replies

3

u/Fatalexcitment 8d ago

Yo I second this lmao. My buddy (along with many others) got married to his high school sweetheart against the advice of many of the older sailors. Almost all of them got devorced after their first deployment. He (my buddy) found out his girl was unable or unwilling to wait, and was thanking another dude. Took his G.I. bill that he gave her, and like 1/2 his shit. (Dumb dumb also was paying for her new-used car he bought for her but was under her name) alsmony is a bitch. Sign a prenup yall.

3

u/brazzy42 8d ago

AFAIK the slang term is "dependa", and it's not at all specific to the navy.

See /r/justdependathings/

16

u/Fuck_auto_tabs 8d ago

Kinda. It’s been a minute so some things may have changed. You can contribute to a Roth IRA much the same you would a civilian 401k. Anyone can do that. If you go 20 years tho that’s when you get a legit pension valued around 40-45% percent of your pay when you left the service. You can add more % if you stay in longer. Idk if you can go back to 100% or if there’s a cut off. Either way I’m pretty sure most of these Civil War dudes didn’t see 20 years and that’s why I mentioned the first part. Also the military had some sort of new pension program in starter mode when I left but I can’t remember anything about it.

Either way, yeah you can call me slut for money. Sounds easier than most jobs I’ve had.

→ More replies

7

u/MiranEitan 8d ago

Up until recently...sort of. If you made it to a certain point, 18-20~ years you could retire and received a certain stipend off of your overall base pay. Something like 60%. You had to be an E6 or higher to make it that long, otherwise you get reduction in force'd out. I knew some guys who made it to 16 then weren't allowed to re-enlist for one reason or another and they didn't have a retirement.

The new system instead of paying you a percentage of your base pay, is more similar to a 401k that you invest in during your time in service and the DoD "matches" your selection. Then when you hit 60something you can pull out your money like a classic 401k. You can do it beforehand but you take some tax hits. Or something? I got out while they were trying to get everyone to swap over to the TSP retirement plan and from the mediocre reception I assume it's not the greatest.

7

u/DarkChyld 8d ago

Old legacy system or high-3 is 2.5% of your base pay if you do a minimum of 20 years of service and you can still contribute to TSP which is similar to 401k. The new system is the blended retirement system or BRS which is 2% of your base pay if you do a minimum of 20 years of service, and you can also contribute to your TSP and the government will match 5% which allows you to at least get a little something if you don't stay in for 20.

→ More replies

3

u/realmenfightnaked 8d ago

Retirees, yes. Veterans, no.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

13

u/Crade_ 8d ago

Screw this guy I'll do it for $8.

→ More replies

22

u/Zenkudai 8d ago

I think there are websites for that now.

13

u/jimicus 8d ago

This was the 1930's; it was a different world. Women didn't work, so if they wanted to eat they pretty well had to find someone and marry him.

7

u/TheTangoFox 8d ago

OF inbound...

5

u/WestonsCat 8d ago

Well this took a turn! Nice.

2

u/Kizik 8d ago

Yea, normally it's the other way around...

2

u/Shas_Erra 8d ago

I’m pretty sure that’s called “Onlyfans”

2

u/WraithWriting 8d ago

Fuck, people can call me a dirty slut for free. I normally pay people to be called names like that.

3

u/1Fresh_Water 8d ago

God, you filthy whore.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

25

u/meshan 8d ago

How much was the pension in 1920s money

106

u/TheHardwoodJournal 8d ago edited 8d ago

$984.31

I'd love an extra 11k (almost 12k) a year for the rest of my life just from marrying an old geezer.

EDIT: I'm now hearing the pension didn't adjust for inflation. That's......pretty dumb. Was there some sort of "immortal protection plan"?

51

u/binghamtonswag 8d ago

Laws were just written a lot more simply at the time of the Civil War when it would have been passed. Tbh I’m not even sure the concept of inflation had been codified.

→ More replies

6

u/dcfogle 8d ago

I don’t really understand pensions so this might be a dumb question but do plans explicitly mention inflation? Or are they invested in ways that are expected but not guaranteed to outpace inflation?

→ More replies

12

u/obvthroway2 8d ago

If you invest even a quarter of that in the stock market every month for the past 80 years, you wouldn't have to worry about inflation

→ More replies
→ More replies

9

u/Nakedwitch58 8d ago

The pension was 75 dollars a months. In the 1920s it would be 15 times that in terms of value

So $1125 a month in todays money

68

u/sophiethegiraffe 8d ago

For $73 and change during the Great Depression, they could have called me a dirty little slut, and I'd remind them frequently that not only was I possibly fucking their dad, the government was paying me for it.

20

u/Nakedwitch58 8d ago

1416 in todays money

Tht amount would have provided food for her whole family back then

32

u/musicaldigger 8d ago

she could have collected once they were dead though, that’s what i would have done

20

u/indianblanket 8d ago

Maybe they're not dead yet

45

u/musicaldigger 8d ago

a 93 year old man in 1936 would have daughters i assume in their 50’s-70’s, i feel like they would have died at least 30-60 years ago

21

u/indianblanket 8d ago

Men can bear children (technically) until they're dead. He could have had daughters closer to the wife's age of 13.

Probably not, but he could have. And then by the time she's 80, that $70 doesn't really go far and she's done well enough without it

14

u/dan2737 8d ago

They can bear children after they're dead if you're extremely dedicated.

7

u/charmingfleabutts 8d ago edited 8d ago

Was a woman that got jail time that way. Worked at the morgue and turned out she was having sex with the dead guys when she got pregnant and tried to sue the guys family for child support. Obviously didn't end well for her but she clearly wasn't the smartest to begin with. Edit: done talking about dead people because Google has scarred me with unwanted necrofillia police sting headlines and people having the sperm taken from dead husbands for artificial impregnation in certain a certain country growing in popularity. A departing and fun fact though is that it is somewhat common for men to get an erection and ejaculate upon death by hanging due to the sudden trauma which has a slang term called Angel lust. Second edit: going to ignore all people linking about the same fake story about a 38 year old woman banging an old man in a bathtub because 1: that source was known fake from the beginning because it was from a tabloid and 2: it's not even close to the one I mentioned, nor the same decade and 3: if you'd have to be lacking brain cells to have fallen for that story that was not credited by any serious news company outside of the internet which should really raise some red flags for you. Every day I get on Reddit, I cherish my memories before the internet was mainstream.

→ More replies
→ More replies

9

u/Luol-Dengue 8d ago

Men can't bear children at all, actually. At least not before they're born.

I learned that the hard way

4

u/indianblanket 8d ago

Hah! Semantics. Thats fun

→ More replies

2

u/Goalie_deacon 8d ago

Yeah, one of the young women that became one of the last Civil War veterans, had a son by her Civil War veteran hubby. She later married his grandson. So that guy raised his own uncle.

→ More replies

8

u/MightUnusual4329 8d ago

She was 17, he was 93.

I mean...why would she marry a 93 year old man if not for the pension?

6

u/BrrToe 8d ago

I mean the girl made the old dudes last days better than his family ever could. As far as I'm concerned, she earned it. Or was the family able to claim it or something?

12

u/thedeafbadger 8d ago

Why did his daughters give two shits?

65

u/Ben-J-N 8d ago

You cool with a 17 year old marrying your 93 year old father?

I mean, the pension isn't their money but it still feels pretty weird and exploitative of what was likely someone not all there.

29

u/murderbox 8d ago

It was pretty common for civil war veterans to do this and they didn't consummate the marriage. I can't remember if they even lived together and now I don't remember why his daughters cared at all.

13

u/squeel 8d ago

What do the civil war vets get out of this kind of arrangement?

14

u/lightsandflashes 8d ago

it's not like it hurts him. maybe he wanted to help the kid.

11

u/LinguisticallyInept 8d ago

article says she helped him around the house (or rather her father volunteered her) and since he didnt want to accept charity this was his attempt to pay her back (but she didnt end up applying for the pension due to pressure/threats from his daughters)... even if it wasnt a recompensory thing though; i mean it didnt cost him anything so why not do something nice for someone else?

→ More replies

4

u/nistanisamkriv 8d ago

I assume the girls took care of them like a home nurse thing or helped around the house

13

u/beerdazzled 8d ago

Maybe a handjob or two

→ More replies
→ More replies

16

u/lightsandflashes 8d ago

if, when my mom is 93, some dude wants to marry her so he can get money for the rest of his life while doing no harm to me or my mom's family, i say go ahead. i'd also inquire whether he had any old relatives i could marry, so that i could scam the government for some cash as well.

→ More replies

9

u/Hairy_Air 8d ago

Ikr. It's not like they would have gotten the pension if it wasn't for her.

→ More replies
→ More replies

45

u/SummertimeGirls 8d ago

Because she never consummated the marriage. The military requires proof.

142

u/gaunt79 8d ago

What, do they require you to submit a bloody sheet in triplicate or something?

57

u/SummertimeGirls 8d ago

Before recording devices they would send exinfantry out to stay in the neighboring room. In this case it was probably a WWI VET. There was no GI Bill back then. It was during the Great Depression, so to get more men paid, they began sending out two guys to listen for it.

President FDR was inspired by this when conceiving the New Deal. He once quipped, how consummation (checks) led to the conception of the New Deal. Everyone laughed. He had a way with words.

36

u/molstern 8d ago

Here's an actual recording, although it's obviously from shortly after the time period you're talking about. It was later used as evidence during a fraud trial

4

u/SummertimeGirls 8d ago

You’re my favorite!!!!

11

u/othermegan 8d ago

If Easy A taught my anything, it’s still really easy to get away with

→ More replies

29

u/sorrynoclueshere 8d ago

Before recording devices they would send exinfantry out to stay in the neighboring room.

I don't see how this proves anything.

94

u/jeepeod 8d ago

Cause he's messing with ya

17

u/ooh_a_phoenix 8d ago

They also used their olfactory senses at the gaps of the door, and inspected the bed sheets for sexual fluids.

4

u/SummertimeGirls 8d ago

Yes!! I read there was a very strict protocol. Cross the Ts

2

u/borismuller 8d ago

…with what?

→ More replies

4

u/Spoonman007 8d ago

A sword needs a sheath, and a wedding needs a bedding.

2

u/ToManyTabsOpen 8d ago

they began sending out two guys

...and that kids is how gangbangs started.

→ More replies
→ More replies

17

u/PM_ME_YOUR_SHITBOX 8d ago

I actually came here hoping to get some idea of the likelihood she consummated the marriage. I want to believe you about the first part, but what's this about the military requiring proof of consummation? How would one go about that?

19

u/WpgMBNews 8d ago

assume everything on the internet is a joke or a lie or both

→ More replies
→ More replies

1k

u/ST616 8d ago

In 2004 it was thought that the last widow of a US Civil War veteran had died, then they found another one. When she died in 2008, it was thought that she was the last one. Then they found yet another one and she died. It's not impossible that there are still living widows who haven't been publicly identified.

The marriage took place in 1936. The last known veteran didn't die until 20 years later. In many states it was legal to for 13 year old girls to marry as long as they had parental permission.

It's possible (albeit unlikely) that there is a widow who won't celebrate her 100th birthday for another decade or two.

648

u/Eziekel13 8d ago

In many states it was legal to for 13 year old girls to marry as long as they had parental permission.

FYI: it still is...

As of July 1, 2019, in 13 states there was no statutory minimum age when all exemptions were taken into account. Between 2000 and 2015, over 200,000 minors were legally married in the United States

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_marriage_in_the_United_States

376

u/ST616 8d ago

It used to be legal. It still is but it also used to be.

118

u/d8abass 8d ago

You used to be cool. You still are, but you used to be.

→ More replies

12

u/jordanperkinsperkins 8d ago

I used to do drugs…

8

u/Autumn1881 8d ago

There are so many stars in the sky! At least 25!

→ More replies

42

u/MarlinMr 8d ago

Between 2000 and 2015, over 200,000 minors were legally married in the United States

There is a gigantic difference between "minors" and 13 year olds.

Minors also includes 17 year olds.

Two 17 year olds marrying to not have children out of wedlock doesn't sound so bad.

130

u/Eziekel13 8d ago

67% of the children were aged 17.

29% of the children were aged 16.

4% of the children were aged 15.

<1% of the children were aged 14 and under.

In over 400 cases, the adult was aged over 40. And in 31 cases, they were over 60.

126

u/XIXXXVIVIII 8d ago

What a terrible day to be able to read.

27

u/ScipioLongstocking 8d ago

I expected way worse. Only 0.002% of the marriages are to people 40 and older. The vast majority of marriages are also 16-17 year olds. What I want to know is how many of these marriages are between a minor and an adult. A 30 year old marrying a 17 year old is still creepy.

8

u/ALoneTennoOperative 8d ago

'Child Marriage in America By the Numbers' has the stats all laid out in an easily-readable format.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

11

u/PM_ME_YOUR_SHITBOX 8d ago

in over 400 cases the adult was over age 40--are you talking about the under-14 child cases, or of all the cases?

10

u/EhhWhatsUpDoc 8d ago

All of the cases

→ More replies

6

u/cambrizzle 8d ago

Holy shit those numbers are fucking terrifying

→ More replies

17

u/danceeforusmonkeyboy 8d ago

I remember hearing that, in Arkansas, they'd put a girl in a barrel, and if her chin came up over the rim she was legal.

If her chin didn't clear the edge of the barrel, they'd cut down the barrel.

5

u/lucius_566 8d ago

relative reality

→ More replies

5

u/fnord_happy 8d ago

Is abortion really that rare in the US?? That 17 year olds have to give birth and then marry because they got pregnant?

8

u/Cmdr_Jhnsn 8d ago

No, plenty of people still get abortions, it’s just that in areas where they don’t there’s a lot of social stigma and pressure around that issue. That, and the United States is the size of Europe, so all of our problems are the scale of an entire continent

→ More replies

3

u/capslock 8d ago

A 2018 study analyzing marriage license data from 41 states found that at over 200,000 minors, 87% girls and 13% boys, were married in the United States between 2000 and 2015.16 A different study, looking at the mental health of child brides in America, estimated between 8.9% and 11.96% of women are married as minors in the United States.

That is almost one out of ten for women. If the ratio were equal then it would be two minors marrying.

https://childusa.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/2020-Report-on-Child-Marriage-in-the-US.pdf

→ More replies
→ More replies

17

u/travelingpenguini 8d ago

It is unlikely for one to be that far from 100. But it is likely that some are still surviving tho even according to the article several were still alive in 2008 but since they were confederate widows they did not want to be named

6

u/Agent641 8d ago

They are like highlanders. There can only be one.

8

u/tophernator 8d ago

Why/how can the government not know how many civil war widows pensions are being paid out?

12

u/ST616 8d ago

The last known widow never claimed the pension that she was entitled to.

→ More replies

2

u/HighPitchedNoise 8d ago

“It is the year 2120. The last widow of a civil war veteran has died at the age of 39.”

→ More replies

52

u/barre_chord_reality 8d ago

I've met patients who are in their 100s who recall their grandparents talking about the civil war and people they knew who fought and died in it.

35

u/Hairy_Air 8d ago

We are about the same distance in time away from the first world war as the people in first world war were away from the Napoleonic wars.

My step Great Grandma had told me in detail about her father fighting for the Brits in the 1st world war. I'd probably live to see the 22nd century if I take care of myself. At which point I could tell stories to my great grandkids about people who have seen wars that happened over two centuries ago.

→ More replies

9

u/MissRockNerd 8d ago

My grandma’s grandpa lost his arm in the Civil War. If she asked him nicely, he’d show her the stump.

1k

u/elle_quay 8d ago

If I never had to live with my husband but I could collect his pension and he would die about 80 years before me…. Sign me up.

1k

u/Practical-Frost 8d ago

Unfortunately she never even got to collect on the pension. He offered to marry her because she had been taking care of him and helping around the house. This being smack in the middle of the Great Depression, the veteran didn't have much money to repay her, so he figured they could get married and she could collect on his pension. Once he died though, his children didn't want her getting the pension, so they threatened to ruin her reputation if she tried to collect. So she ended up keeping the marriage secret for over 80 years, until she finally revealed the truth to her lawyer while making plans for her own funeral. It's actually a pretty sad story

96

u/maimou1 8d ago

I've seen two or three situations like this in my nursing career. one was a gay couple who both were terminally ill, and one of the men's sisters was taking care of them. she married the man who obviously was not her brother, so that she could receive his pension after his death. her brother left her his estate which wasn't much in return for her caring for him. I've also seen a few foreign brides who were friends with my patient before they became terminally ill, and married the patient to provide end of life care and then benefit from any estate or pensions. in each of the situations I've seen, the caregiver has been a pretty decent person, because taking care of a dying person is not a picnic

→ More replies

401

u/YareYareDaze7 8d ago

Damn that's sad :(

63

u/[deleted] 8d ago

[deleted]

574

u/BigFloppyMick 8d ago

He was trying to repay her for taking care of him, when his own children wouldn’t

→ More replies

129

u/azrael6947 8d ago

Yeah, she did a lovely thing when there was next to nothing to go around and he repaid her kindness.

100

u/Thomas_Catthew 8d ago

People tend to forget that (even though it still is common), people used to marry for practical reasons other than just romance/sex.

Especially when polygamy was acceptable, you'd see people marrying just to keep their spouse from falling into financial ruin.

51

u/barandor 8d ago

they weren't even in love though?

She was 17 and he was 93.... wouldn't expect it.

75

u/chumswithcum 8d ago

They could have loved each other very much - apparently she was kind to him and he wanted to give her something to repay her kindness - love doesn't have to be romantic or sexual.

19

u/cutelyaware 8d ago

Yes, I've heard of same sex heterosexuals who became close friends in nursing homes and had civil unions for love and practical reasons but not sexual.

5

u/Mr_4country_wide 8d ago

some 55 year old married his 85 year old mate cuz the 85 year old was about to die and had no family, and inheritance is taxed less if it goes to a spouse than to friend.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/dec/23/two-heterosexual-irish-men-marry-to-avoid-inheritance-tax-on-house

I got the ages wrong but whatever

→ More replies
→ More replies

83

u/wiseknob 8d ago

Hate to break it to you, but a lot of marriages are usually transactional and not based on love.

20

u/grambell789 8d ago

Some fall in love with the transaction

33

u/p-4_ 8d ago

especially in dire economic times

11

u/996forever 8d ago

Most of human civilisation actually

6

u/No_Masterpiece4305 8d ago

Ya but people have transactional marriages all the time.

Fuck, marriage is literally just a transactional obligation between two people.

The church doesn't really give a hoot if you love you're partner.

→ More replies

3

u/SaintSimpson 8d ago

Reading that story, it seems to me there was love. It wasn’t romantic, but she cared for him and he wanted to take care of her however he could.

2

u/Nonions 8d ago

Reading about some of the other women who were in similar situations, they married because it was considered indecent for a man and woman to live together if they were unmarried, even if the relationship was essentially one of a live in carer and employer.

→ More replies

88

u/TheSameButBetter 8d ago

I know of a modern day version of this.

Back in 2005 I was doing a signalling course. The tutor was in his 60s and had worked on the railways since he was 16. As he had reached senior management level while British Rail still existed (pre-privatisation) he had both a gold card and a really awesome pension scheme. His pension would pay out to his spouse for ten years after his death. The gold card was an unlimited 1st class travel pass given to senior managers. His wife and any children would also be entitled to one.

Since privatisation, such perks were no longer offered - but those who already had them would be entitled to keep them with the successor company having to pay for them. In this fellows case his employer (Network Rail) had offered a very large sum of money to buy back his card and to switch to different pension scheme.

Anyways, he married a 19 year old - he was a randy old bugger. So her and their kids will have that gold card for a very long time.

24

u/Jai_Cee 8d ago

With the state of the British railways who would marry someone just to get free train tickets?

36

u/fuckusnowman 8d ago

Commuting costs from some towns near London into London is like £6k a year for a season ticket. Getting that free is like a £12k a year payrise. For life.

→ More replies

24

u/TheSameButBetter 8d ago

They didn't do it just for the tickets, there was genuine love. But he kept bringing up the benefits for her and how much it was worth,

TBH I think he had issues with his employer and was enjoying screwing them over.

3

u/TurkeyPhat 8d ago

TBH I think he had issues with his employer and was enjoying screwing them over.

So he got to stick it to the man on top of everything else? I believe they call his type a Chad these days.

→ More replies
→ More replies

15

u/Newwby 8d ago

With the state of British railways it could amount to insane savings on those stupidly priced tickets tbf

9

u/Themoneymancan 8d ago

A masochist

→ More replies

50

u/Firsttrygaming 8d ago

This is oddly close to the plot of Knives Out

32

u/Additional_Meeting_2 8d ago

What is common there apart from family wanting woman woman to have money who here had a relationship with their relative and there didn’t?

13

u/ours 8d ago

Her lawyer actually coined the whole doughnut holes dialog later used by Daniel Craig!

6

u/jim_deneke 8d ago

Hope those kids couldn't claim it then.

→ More replies

30

u/AvoidingCares 8d ago

If you were my wife, I'd drink it.

10

u/WrathfulVengeance13 8d ago

Why did you get married if you would rather him dead?

→ More replies
→ More replies

182

u/codamission 8d ago

14th Missouri Cavalry

Union gang represent

41

u/Aletheia-Pomerium 8d ago

Way down south in the land of traitors

r/shermanposting

17

u/Romofan88 8d ago

Rattle snakes, and Alligators

11

u/codamission 8d ago

Ride away! Come away,

→ More replies
→ More replies

71

u/XNwPlZQMHP 8d ago edited 8d ago

WW2 is a bit more recent, but my 93 year grandmother still gets like 2k € every month because my grandfather was injured in WW2 (as a German soldier). He has been dead for 25 years now.

I wasn't really aware of her financial situation until a few years ago, when i started to take care of her. It was kind of surprising that i have to fill out paperwork for veterans on a regular basis now, 80 years after the war has ended. It kind of makes sense that the german state takes care of their veterans and their spouses, even if they were soldiers for the nazis (or nazi soldiers? grandfather was kind of alright though, as far as we could find out. just a soldier that got shot twice, never was able to really use his left arm anymore and was a pow of the russians for a while. and he voted liberal for the rest of his life), but i didn't expect it to be that much (my grandmother would certainly struggle financially without that money) for so long.

35

u/dzastrus 8d ago

Taking responsibility for a life altering disability is honorable. Seeing to it that the soldier's widow, whose life was also affected by her husband's disability receive his/their ongoing support is well worth the investment. Thanks, Germans.

→ More replies

12

u/Hairy_Air 8d ago

My step Great Grandma still recieves a very heavy pension from the government (more than a Middle class income) even today 30 years after great granpa is gone. She also get free first class railway tickets for her and an attendent if she were to ever travel the country.

There was about 40 years of age gap between them. Great grandpa married her soon after my great grandma died but they didn't have any children for decades as she was practically a child when they married. She was his friend's daughter and he was dying and had no money.

Hence my step Great uncle is actually younger than my oldest uncle. And some of my uncles on that side of the family are only a few years older than me. It's a weird dynamic but I was always used to it.

4

u/toolittle-toolate 8d ago edited 8d ago

My grandfather was given a construction job on Wake Island as a part of the New Deal. They were told that if they were attacked, civilians were expected to take up arms and fight alongside the soldiers to protect the island. They were attacked, he was captured, and he spent 3 years in a Japanese POW camp. When the war was over, he came home with PTSD and disabilities caused by exposure to radiation (blind in one eye) due to performing slave labor in a factory. He had endured 3 years of starvation and torture.

He was not given veteran status until after his death decades later. I think then finally my grandma, who by then was an elderly widow who had supported him emotionally and financially for about 4 decades, finally received benefits including a pension.

I’m glad she finally got her benefits but I really don’t think it should have taken that long when they were literally handed guns and ordered to fight. Sure maybe they didn’t get the benefit of boot camp first but they literally fought in the war and suffered because of it.

→ More replies

4

u/gingercat04 8d ago

Similar thing with my 101 year old grandma here in the United States. My grandfather was in the Navy during WWII and served on a ship that was attacked my the Japanese in the Pacific. I don’t know how much my grandma gets each month, but I know it has helped for her assisted living home for the last 20+ years. My grandpa died in 1998 and she is still provided his VA benefits.

→ More replies

50

u/Criticalhit_jk 8d ago

Does it adjust for inflation?

214

u/Practical-Frost 8d ago

No it sure didn't. In fact, the US government was paying a civil war pension to the daughter of a veteran until just last year, and the amount remained the same over 90 years. At the time, $73.13 a month was considered quite generous. Adjusting for inflation it would be equal to about $1250 today, and since this was the Great Depression, that was a pretty decent income. Unfortunately the woman in the article never actually got to collect on the pension. The veteran's children didn't want her to have it so they threatened to ruin her reputation if she tried to collect. Talk about shitty inlaws

41

u/travelingpenguini 8d ago

I think it's even shittier that it was literally a payment agreement for work that she had done for their father and they still didn't want her to have it. And that she clearly was affected enough to have never remarried or had her own children (tho this may have been because the marriage would have had to have been made public for a divorce to remarry)

→ More replies

19

u/maximusvegas45 8d ago

That's sad. Her in-laws wouldn't lose a single cent if she was paid. It's just next level nastiness.

→ More replies
→ More replies

60

u/No-Pizda-For-You 8d ago

It was a union of convenience, they were both confederates in this scheme but the kids rebelled

26

u/jethroguardian 8d ago

At least they kept it civil.

6

u/HistoryCorner 8d ago

No, Union.

9

u/NoHate_GarbagePlates 8d ago

Confederate here doesn't refer to their military allegiance. They're confederates (ie participants) of a scheme, not Confederates who hatched a scheme.

17

u/mynueaccownt 8d ago

American civil war*

→ More replies

4

u/thisideups 8d ago

After reading this... and the comments... wow. On every side. Wow. In every way. Wow.

90

u/mellowmonk 8d ago

It wasn’t a “practice” like a group of elders sitting around decided it. It’s just that poor women knew they’d at least avoid starvation if they married one of those dudes. The equivalent of a civil servant with a pension.

50

u/Arken96 8d ago

So it was a practice

→ More replies

13

u/CantHitachiSpot 8d ago

It's not a practice like a medical practice. Just a practice like something people did often.

→ More replies
→ More replies

47

u/FrankieSaysRelax311 8d ago

They married in 1936 while she was 17 and he was 93.

Do what?

174

u/Practical-Frost 8d ago

She had been helping take care of the veteran, kind of like a nurse. So he offered to get married so she could collect on the pension for repayment. I don't think there was any kind of sexual or emotional aspect to the relationship.

126

u/Mord42 8d ago

Honestly that just really sweet... The old guy knew he was gonna die soon so he offered to help out someone who has been helping him...

→ More replies

27

u/Solid_State_Driver 8d ago

It was never a real relationship, no sex, just business

28

u/WantToBeACyborg 8d ago

I think we've all been there

11

u/redsyrinx2112 8d ago

But what about Business Time?

→ More replies

12

u/kyunirider 8d ago

Hey as a southerner and a product of May/December marriages in my family history, many of these unions were loving bonds that last their remaining lives. My great grandfather married his second bride (my Granny) when she was 17. He was 47. They had seven kids with one set of twins. I remember the fondly but as a father I am glad my daughters were all into their careers before marrying. Don’t hold modern people by past practices. We change and we grow.

→ More replies

14

u/ArthurianX 8d ago

Saved you a click: She never claimed the pension, she never remarried or have kids.

3

u/skindiver1958 8d ago

Anyone interested in a fictional account of this very thing, do yourself a favor and look up Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All: A Novel by Allan Gurganus. It was his first novel and was published in 1989. It was on The NY Times Best Seller list for eight months and is truly the best thing I’ve ever read.

Let me know how much you loved it after you’ve finished reading it. I pick it up every couple of years just to reacquaint myself with Lucy Marsden. It’s a hefty but glorious read!

2

u/GrandmasHere 8d ago

I came here to see if someone mentioned this book. I agree — it’s a great read. It’s time for me to read it again.

→ More replies

10

u/danllo2 8d ago

Some of you people on here are some disrespectful a-holes.

2

u/Ridikiscali 8d ago

Did southerners get the pension or only union soldiers?

→ More replies

2

u/ReverendDoctorQuark 8d ago

This is the third "last Civil War widow died" story I've seen in the past 20 years.

2

u/InevitableWing8608 8d ago

how old were his sisters at the time.. couldn’t she just wait to outlive their already 90 year old asses?

→ More replies