r/funny May 04 '21

But i like what i have okay?

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104k Upvotes

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u/mattdotnet May 04 '21 edited May 04 '21

My mom bought her house for $120k in the 90's. It just got appraised for $600k. Me and my wife make under 100k and either have to move away from both our families or rent until we die. It's pretty fucking cool.

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u/druglawyer May 04 '21

Parents bought their house in 1975 for $40k. In a nice suburb. Dad was a social worker, mom was a part time secretary. House is worth $900k now. They do not understand why a social worker and a part time secretary cannot buy a house in a nice suburb today, even though pretty much every one of their neighbors who moved in in the last 2 decades is a doctor, lawyer, or corporate executive.

Boomers really are the absolute worst.

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u/skippyfa May 04 '21

Mom: Didn't wages also go up by 2000%?

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21 edited May 04 '21

"I made less than $3 an hour in 1972!!!" my grandfather arguing against a $15 minimum wage.... Okay gramps but that's roughly $19 in today's dollars.

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u/Janus_Grayden May 04 '21

Right? They'll talk about what they got paid in one breath and then the next, they'll talk any how you could buy a hamburger for a dime.

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u/nom_nom_nom_nom_lol May 04 '21

"Gasoline was only a nickel a gallon when I got my first car. Paid 300 bucks for it. Worked all summer mowing lawns to save up."

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u/KushyNuggets May 04 '21

My FIL has a job that pays nearly $150k/year and they're actively hiring 20 something year olds to replace him at 1/4 his salary. He still gets his $150k/year forever but the young guys get $40k/year. He brags about it. Disgusting. Boomer stuff.

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u/readwaytoooften May 04 '21

Unless he owns the company he's only going to be employed until it's worth it to the owner two keep the extra $100k for himself...

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u/IcarusOnReddit May 04 '21

That assumes the owner is rational. I have worked at many companies where that is very very untrue.

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u/thesaunders May 04 '21

I currently work for one of these!

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u/ajohns95616 May 04 '21

This was how my dad was laid off. Like 20 years ago.

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u/KushyNuggets May 04 '21

Yea thats not how modern corporations work. If they were to fire him for no reason other than the salary there would be a very costly lawsuit against the employer. They don't like costly lawsuits, so boomers get to keep getting paid more than any new hire.

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u/Ghost17088 May 05 '21

Most states are at-will employment. They can fire him for any reason or no reason at all provided he’s not fired for being in a protected class.

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u/XboxOneDad May 04 '21

I don't understand this $150k forever stuff. Gen X here wants in on that deal.

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u/dweezil22 May 04 '21

It's easy, just be born 50 years ago and get a job with a pension, hang on for a few decades. Now roll a D20.

15+: Congratulations, you got raises and your pension held on and you get six figures for the rest of your life.

10+: You didn't get all the raises but you still get a decent $50k/yr pension plus your SS, which ain't bad

5+: Re-org! Your pension converts into an 401K type deal. If you die young this is good, otherwise it'll tap out 10 years into your retirement. Kinda sucks, but realistically it's all you would have saved with a 401k (this is where post-Boomers typically end up if they roll a 15).

< 5: Womp womp. Company got bought out and your pension rights got changed around age 50, when you were too young to get anything. Sorry you wasted 20 years of your life working towards the pension, better luck next life!

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u/Vincent210 May 04 '21

Can’t believe that < 5 scenario is even legal.

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u/ProlapsePatrick May 04 '21

They can take your entire pension?

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u/[deleted] May 04 '21

Its awful. Many many fields are facing that situation. Jobs that SHOULD be highly paid positions around 150k are not. Because of exactly that. There are so many people in the hiring pool that they can just ignore the people who know what theyre worth. Why take someone who demands a proper salary when you can hire the guy next to him who doesnt think hes worth anything.

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u/[deleted] May 04 '21

[removed]

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u/[deleted] May 04 '21

Imagine being racist in 2021

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u/Null_zero May 04 '21

I'm pretty sure he was being sarcastic. Could be wrong but seems pretty tongue in cheek to me.

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u/Logeboxx May 04 '21

Did you forgot your /s?

Please tell me you just forgot it. ...

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u/sevenstaves May 04 '21

Technically you can still buy a car for $300.

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u/FFF_in_WY May 04 '21

I think the comparison involves a working engine and transmission and various other functional nonsense. But a fully functional bicycle on the other hand..!

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u/et27U4Y4qse0AIcyFZg8 May 04 '21

But a fully functional bicycle on the other hand..!

Shit, have you been bike shopping lately? Anything not a plastic walmart bike will run you $300 minimum.

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u/PencilLeader May 04 '21

Can confirm, bought a new bike, cost just under $1000.

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u/lalaland4711 May 04 '21

Hey, I resemble that remark!

I sold a car for less than that, and it was fine. Just fine! As long as you used this special trick when putting it in first gear (too hard to explain for a comment). And pressed down and in when you closed the trunk. And used this other trick in case the driver side door would not open from the inside. And NEVER filled it up more than half the tank.

Valid inspection. Good to go.

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u/JoshSidekick May 04 '21

My first car was this kind of terrible and I loved it.

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u/swolemedic May 04 '21

Bruh, you can't even register a car for 300 dollars. I just changed my car's registration from NJ to OR and it cost me 400 bucks.

Sure, you can find a heap of metal that maybe turns on for 300 dollars but you aren't driving it on any roads for that price.

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u/the_silkworm May 04 '21

from NJ to OR

You really don't like to pump your own gas, do you?

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u/rtb001 May 04 '21

As an ex Oregonian it was a nice blast of nostalgia to get gas in New Jersey.

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u/swolemedic May 04 '21

Hah! I was actually surprised I wasn't allowed to pump my gas when I got here. I thought it was only NJ with laws like that but nope, apparently we have it here as well

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u/lighten_up_n_laff May 04 '21 edited May 04 '21

but you aren't driving it on any roads for that price.

its called ridin' dirty... *Chamillionaire made a whole song about it

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u/Topikk May 04 '21

sad Chamillionaire noises

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u/VAiSiA May 04 '21

you dont know me

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u/KeLLyAnneKanye2020 May 04 '21

For real $300 is barely two months liability insurance

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u/0b0011 May 04 '21

Depends on where you live. It's a bit over 3 months full coverage for me.

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u/DrZoidberg- May 04 '21

If I could "work all summer" to buy a car.

Say $5k. Over 3 months. Yeah lol not happening.

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u/Narrative_Causality May 04 '21

Oh man, I love the "Worked a part time job in the summer to afford college" crowd. Jesus.

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u/TheBionicPuffin May 05 '21

My dad's first car was a 69 Corvette Stingray. He was a tuna fisherman... My brain blocked whatever he said he paid for it because it was absurdly low.

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u/[deleted] May 04 '21 edited May 05 '21

[removed]

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u/Logeboxx May 04 '21

Shouldn't a good portion of that may be offset by increased production efficiency. I would imagine the labor costs to produce a quite a bit lower when adjusted.

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u/wutami09 May 04 '21

Meanwhile the cheapest car for sale in my town is a deflated 1980s Chrysler New Yorker for $1500...

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u/dormDelor May 04 '21

Fucking this. Gets my rage up every time.

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u/FerrisMcFly May 04 '21

My grandma was legit telling me how her mother used to send her to the store with 5$ to buy groceries for the week then asked why I didn't have a house yet in the next sentence.

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u/damasu950 May 04 '21

Sending a kid to buy the groceries sounds like a good way to end up living on Pixie Stix

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u/EmotionalKirby May 04 '21

Nowadays, sure. Back then, you'd get beat to an inch of your life if you even thought of pixie sticks.

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u/bassfetish May 04 '21

Not to mention that the grocer knows your mother and father and would certainly raise an eyebrow or two at the little kid trying to pass off candy as mom and dad's grocery order.

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u/vanityiinsanity May 05 '21

Shit the store would call home if they thpugh something was fishy enough

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u/damasu950 May 04 '21

Oh I used to get my fucking ass beat. I knew it was a crime and I did it anyway.

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u/ROBRO-exe May 04 '21

I never understand why kids would shoot themselves in the foot like this. I’ve always tried my best to make my parents think i’m super financially responsible, i don’t ask for much stuff. It’s benefitted me a lot as unlike my siblings, I’ve convinced them to put me on their credit card as a teen, already building my credit score for later in life.

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u/FerrisMcFly May 04 '21

Nah, this was the 50s. Kids were more responsible than half of today's adults.

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u/cbblevins May 04 '21

and it never occurs to them that a minimum wage today is like on average 7-8 bucks and a hamburger is fucking $5 lmao how do you not see the problem here

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u/warm_sweater May 04 '21

Fuck I only graduated from university 15 years ago and the economics of that are jacked up as well. I “only” took out 15k in student loans, and paid for the rest while working full time.

I don’t think that would be possible in 2021.

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u/averagedickdude May 04 '21

And how they used to tie onions to their belts and there were bees stamped on their coinage.

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u/[deleted] May 04 '21

[deleted]

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u/averagedickdude May 04 '21

That's what they'd say...

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u/elementary_penguins May 04 '21

My favorite response to that is to ask how much a loaf of bread cost them. When they invariably say something like," a nickel" I give them a quarter and tell them to get one and bring back change.

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u/[deleted] May 04 '21 edited May 04 '21

[deleted]

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u/THedman07 May 04 '21

Jesus... How much do you think people drink?

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u/Spikeball25 May 04 '21

I agree with you to an extent, but while budgeting is not a strong point for a lot of young people today, we also want things to be improving on the whole. I'm sure you sacrificed a lot to get your house, but the point is you shouldn't have had to. If people were able to work regular jobs and save up for a house a couple decades ago, the same should be possible now. However real wages have gone down whole other costs have increased significantly. Just because you got yours doesn't mean that everyone else is stupid or wrong.

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u/ineedztahpoopie May 04 '21

Yeah for sure I was able to afford a house by using my brother, he's a vet. He's doesn't need a down payment. Now we all live together in a 3 bedroom house with 2 other roommates and their 2 children so we can have financial mobility. Everyone just needs to give up their personal space and/or pick up another job so they can afford what our parents had with one job. Duh guys. Stop buying avocado toast. Only eat ramen. The cheap kind, no dehydrated veggies for you. Also make sure you don't get sick or have any kind of accident whatsoever, you lazy millennials.

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u/Relganis May 04 '21

Sure sounded like a bootstrap prick until I saw the edit. That's a good call.

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u/IATAvalanche May 04 '21

Kewl story.

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u/su5 May 04 '21

My grandfather's friend used to brag that he paid for medical school by lifeguarding over the summer. Nothing could be said to help him understand that doesn't work today and he is a doctor so should be smarter

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

Holy shit I couldn't pay for medical school robbing people all summer...

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u/FrenchFriesOrToast May 04 '21

You should start with a robbery workshop over a weekend, then one summer season and after that medical school

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u/Channel250 May 04 '21 edited May 04 '21

No no no. See you go to rob one person, but instead you convince him on how easy and lucrative robbing people is. And how, for just a small percentage of his robberies he can be a robber too and make the big bucks.

Then that guy convinces three other guys to become robbers and all of their revenue is now part of your downstream.

You guys are acting like suckers.

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u/booi May 04 '21

We’ll call this MLM, Jack+Rob

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u/su5 May 04 '21

So I just lifeguard to pay for the robbery school?

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u/Brad_Beat May 04 '21

Just let people drown and rob their houses while the family is at the funeral.

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u/FrenchFriesOrToast May 04 '21

Sounds like a good idea to me

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u/Mczern May 04 '21

You should start with a robbery workshop over a weekend, then one summer season and after that medical school

FTFY. He can tell them they need to get in on the ground floor with this amazing opportunity. I mean most MLMs are just that. Robbery.

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u/84Dexter May 04 '21

Yeah, robberies just don't cut it nowadays if you're paying those insane university tuitions.

You'll need to orchestrate and pull off at least 1 or 2 heists, possibly more if you have a shitty heist crew and someone drops a bag of cash, or crashes the getaway vehicle.

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u/grendus May 04 '21

"Goddamn it Carl! We were set! We could have graduated with only five figures in debt! Now I'm going to have to switch my major to nursing just to make ends meet! You and your stupid butterfingers!"

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u/chaka_khan May 04 '21

Not with that attitude.

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u/Alphaomega1115 May 04 '21

He does understand, he just doesn't want to so pretends he doesn't.

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u/Raichu4u May 04 '21

It would have to make him back down and admit that he's wrong.

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u/sevenstaves May 04 '21

He's also more disconnected from the every day man due to his wealth. Rich people tend to surround themselves with people of their own socioeconomic status.

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u/airlew May 04 '21

In my experience doctors tend to be real smart when it comes to medical knowledge. However, all that medical knowledge seems to have taken up any other space in their brain for other knowledge.

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u/Brad_Beat May 04 '21

Some are well educated and can speak about anything. A lot are almost illiterate about anything other than their practice.

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u/Betaateb May 04 '21

Just lifeguard for 4 maybe 5 thousand summers, and bam, med school paid for.

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u/jert3 May 04 '21

I just simply do not understand why your grandpa would be blamed for this and not something useful or relevant, like wage stagnation or the fact that over 50% of the world’s resources are now owned by the top 0.01% of the rich.

Of course your grandpa is going to be out of touch having not checked real estate prices for 50 years. But it’s not his fault prices are high.

It’s like every one avoids the actual issues by just saying ‘oh its the boomers bad lol.’

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u/Sansa_Knows_Armor May 04 '21

Grandpa still knows about inflation and him telling me about unadjusted wages from his time is irrelevant and dishonest.

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u/LordDongler May 04 '21

I explained this to my grandmother. "I worked part time at the Levi's factory putting pockets on jeans for $2.50 an hour in 1968, and I put myself through school on that. You just need to work hard, you don't need to make a bunch of money"

Coincidentally, $2.50 in 1968 is $19 today as well. I guess it was more common back in the day to pay people a livable wage.

This conversation came about when I complained that it's difficult to find a job making more than $10-$12/hour unless you have a ton of qualifications and experience

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u/AgentScreech May 04 '21

Did the same thing with my mom. She said she was working part time as a waitress in the late 60's. It was equal to $50k/yr in today's money... Part time.

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

Old people just don't understand this at all. And my family can't understand why I moved my family 5000km away to live in one of the ONLY cities in our country that pays a living wage... Our living wage here is about $14 an hour and minimum wage is $15 an hour but some places did NOT do well. Halifax Nova Scotia has a living wage of $22 an hour with a minimum wage of like $11 an hour haha. 124k a year average income vs them with an average income below 32k...

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u/SappyCedar May 04 '21

cries in coastal British Columbian. Victoria's average house price is now 1.2 million dollars, like what the fuck that is not a good thing. At this rate it feels like eventually it's going to get to the point where the only people who can afford homes are the extremely wealthy, then they'll just buy it all and rent it to the shuffling masses. I was talking to my Dad who only just a few years ago bought a small pre-built condo his 50s and he was saying that in the 80s in Victoria he just kind of assumed he would always be able to eventually but a house here, by the 2000s is when he realized he fucked up.

It doesn't even seem to be a city thing anymore tough, it seems like the same problem is slowly infecting the whole country. We visited my girlfriend's tiny Alberta home town last summer, and the prices there were definitely inflated for how small and uninviting the town is.

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

At least you guys have decent wages... My city has an average income of 160k and average housing cost of 427K... Nova Scotia average is 32k in income and the average house is 450k lol.

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u/EightiesBush May 04 '21

Need to get yourself on that hash-driveway train bud

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u/SappyCedar May 04 '21

Yeah that's true, jobs are easier to come by here as well.

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u/B_U_F_U May 04 '21

Tbf it doesn’t take much critical thinking skills to put pockets onto pants. Anyone who thinks things now should be similar to 60 years ago very obviously lacks the ability to think critically. I mean, all you (generally speaking) need to know is what inflation is and you can start asking the necessary questions to compare the times.

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u/salad_sanga May 05 '21

Can we also remember what people bought back then. A house had one phone, one tv, one car, no computer. There was less to buy. I'm not defending boomers but today a family of five probably has 3 TVs, 3 laptops, 3-5 mobile phones AKA tiny computers depending on the children's ages. We definitely could spend less. Life is so much more consumer driven now.

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u/BaronVonBaron May 04 '21

AND COLLEGE WAS SUBSIDIZED FOR HER

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u/Dissadent34 May 04 '21 edited May 04 '21

Depends on what your looking for. In 2007 I started an apprenticeship position as an electrician at $12/hr and a year later I was worth 15/hr and it just went up year after year. No college and no debt. The sooner you start the sooner you will make more money and learn enough to do side work for even more money.

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u/buchfraj May 04 '21

No it's not, there are tons of places hiring for way more than that. I'm a partner in a lawncare/landscaping company and were hiring constantly at $16+ an hour for entry level work in a cheap midwestern town. If you can do any tree work then we'll pay you like you have an advanced degree. If you even remotely developed HVAC or plumbing skills then youd be able to name your price at tons of places.

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u/LordDongler May 04 '21

When I was in high school I assisted a HVAC guy, but he was half conman and barely paid me so I ditched him when I graduated. Maybe I should look into that

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u/buchfraj May 04 '21

Do it, like I'm hiring on a contractual basis for $15 an hour+ mileage for a delivery driver on weekends. There are tons of jobs that pay well but they either require skills or they're not standard 9-5 type gigs.

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u/bolerobell May 04 '21

And most of that inflation was in the 70s too, so it's not like they didn't see their own wages grow dramatically from like the mid 70s to mid 80s.

Not only are they disconnected from the modern world, they completely forget their own personal wage experiences in favor of embracing the outrage de jour.

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u/CoolFiverIsABabe May 04 '21

They never had to face the type of competition that is present today. The fact that many stories are about how hard they worked with their multiple jobs shows not only how abundant jobs were but that they were even convenient enough to be able to space them apart.

Many full time jobs don't have a set schedule so trying to add another if it were available is difficult. I also had to deal with weird shifts because managers were trying to get under their labor budget by doing things like 7 days in a row with 5-6 hour shifts at completely different times so you didn't quite get your 40.

How could you possibly add another job and give them a reliable availability?

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u/DstroyaX May 04 '21

I don't know if it is still like this, but I worked for Starbucks as a shift supervisor. In the mid 2000s policy changed, and I was expected to provide and commit to 60 hours of availability but was only guaranteed 35 hours of work, while making like 10-11 dollars an hour.

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u/Studyblade May 04 '21

Companies will always do whatever they can to benefit themselves, even if it means absolutely fucking over the workers in the process because usually, they can just grab another sap off the street.

This is why we need government mandated living wages, universal healthcare, etc.

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u/Old_Ladies May 04 '21

Don't forget about unions.

My friend used to work at a factory making windows and doors. They would give him just barely below the threshold to be paid full time with benefits. After years of working like that he found a new job and gave his 2 weeks notice. The factory immediately said they would pay him full time with benefits if he stayed. So many companies are exploiting their workers.

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u/AshFraxinusEps May 04 '21

Yep, my parents, before I finally convinced them to cough up a ton of money to help me, thought I could get a 2nd job. I work 6 day weeks and can be called in for overtime at any moment. There is no 2nd job that fits that schedule, let alone one which would leave me a moment of free time

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u/FixedLoad May 04 '21

Good thing you had parents and with money to cough up at that! Mine would sooner sew their lips shut and aspirate the cash vomit.

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u/AshFraxinusEps May 04 '21

Yep, I fully agree I am lucky that my parents have money. And a friend has parents who are gonna help with a few tens of thousands. Otherwise I'd be renting until the day I die, and most I know who don't have parents with money are stuck in that boat. They can earn money until 65+ and would be able to afford a house as they can afford rent. But they can't put the money down to get started, or don't earn the annual income to qualify for post-2008 mortgage rules. It's stupid: 18 yos should be given £200k+ in debt for a mortgage underwritten by the government, and by the age of 50 most will have paid off their house

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u/FixedLoad May 04 '21

My military service secured me a gauraunteed VA mortgage, which is essentially what you've described, only more of a "co-signer" since it is from a private lender.
I bought a 150k house in an amazing neighborhood in 2015. Currently, market value is 250k (zillow). My view of the current housing crisis is not one that I feel contributes much to the conversation. I just keep telling people to move to Pittsburgh. It's a trip back to the 80s and 90s with a touch of today!
Consistently rated very high.

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u/Darknightdreamer May 04 '21

As someone who works in a grocery store I can say this is a fact. I've been asking for along time to have a steady schedule so I could pick up an extra side gig. There's been several times where I'll come in and work 1:30 to 10pm, then be off, then 5am to 1:30pm, then 1:30 to 10pm again.

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u/Low_on_camera_funds May 04 '21

Lol my friend has this schedule and sees nothing wrong with it because he hates 8 hour days but yet cry’s when he can’t buy weed that week I’m like come on spongebob ask them for a real schedule not this ducking around kid shit

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u/CoolFiverIsABabe May 04 '21

The issue is when the cost of living is high which was the case in this major city that commute was. A couple hours both ways. If you get less hours but have to pay to commute more times it's effectively lessening the pay of the worker while giving them undesirable work conditions and health since having shifts that do not allow for a normal sleep schedule is hurting employees.

These are things that point to a need for reformation of capitalism for the citizens in lower economic groups if the country wants a prosperous and strong nation. If they just want to be controlling, gain as many resources as possible and not care about people no matter where they live then capitalism continues to do its job. Is that what the people really want?

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u/Low_on_camera_funds May 04 '21

Like I hear Disney workers now have to show Up one unpaid hour early to get thought the check in and parking since it’s time consuming due to COVID or they will be late and written up. But those lucky bastards get 7k in free admission tickets a year so go figure lol

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u/CoolFiverIsABabe May 04 '21

That only has worth to the company. If they go for "free" they will probably spend something eventually. Regardless if they do or do not they have spent their time there which is another currency. You can't pay bills with free admission.

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

Yea and the funniest part is he worked at a grocery store... and raised 3 kids in a nice house with more than one vehicle in the drive...

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u/Lifesagame81 May 04 '21

To be fair, if you get into a mid to high level store supervisor/manager level today, you could probably afford your individual health care premium, renting a 1 bedroom apartment, and have enough money left over to feed yourself and maybe sock away a couple of hundred dollars each month. In 42 years you could spring for a down payment on a home in the suburbs of the suburbs.

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u/Coyotesamigo May 05 '21

I started in the retail business in 2006 making 7.25 an hour (fresh outta college). Now I’m a high level manager at a different store in a different state and own a house and support a family. I had a lot of help and at least some luck to end up where I am. I also wouldn’t recommend grocery store management to many. I’ve been on 24/7 emergency call list since 2013 and I’ve learned only a certain type of person can accept heading into an unknown shitshow of unknown proportions after being woken up at 2am after a 10 hour workday. I’m not 100% I’m that person despite spending most of my adult life pretending to be.

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u/ParaglidingAssFungus May 04 '21

So many exaggerations. I make roughly 100k, have a wife that doesn't work, and a child, and I just bought a place on 7 acres for 550k within commuting distance of a large city in the PNW, and we live very comfortably. And no I'm not a trust fund baby with rich parents. I grew up poor as shit and my mom lives on my property in a 5th wheel on SSI.

Yet there is people in this thread saying you'll never own a home bringing home 100k. Life doesn't revolve around NYC LA and the Bay Area. If you're trying to buy in those areas where there is a limited amount of homes and a ton of high earners, no shit it's going to be tough. But with the way this thread is talking you'd think that a mid career average earning couple will never be able to buy a house.

Make sound life and financial choices over time and they accumulate into being able to do great things. I have been a "high" earner since 2014ish, although with two dependants I don't think I am, but I wasn't able to buy a place like this the second j started making money. I bought a small piece of shit house for 120k at first. Saved money and worked on it and sold it to buy a bigger house. Did the same thing with that house and was able to buy the one I am in now.

Results don't come immediately, but they will eventually when good decisions accumulate.

And I am generally speaking about mid career higher wage earners like myself. I am aware this isn't true for folks working for minimum wage and that is unfortunate, but it's incredible the amount of people in this thread that think that because they can't buy a house in Palo Alto while making 100k that no one can.

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u/zoomer7822 May 04 '21

Username Checks Out.

Yes if you make 100k in the PNW you can afford a house. That being said 100k is a lot of cash to be making. The wife and I make 87K together and we want kids which means back down the to 60k from just me. Guess were never owning a house if she get pregnant. The post was more about how someone didn't have to have a top level job to own a house. Guessing you work in Tech?

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u/Lifesagame81 May 05 '21

$100k is also in the top 10% of individual income. He's right that working hard, having the federal government cover much of your training and education, making the right career field choices, capitalizing on repairing and flipping the homes you live on, and being willing to love away from population centers can put you in a comfortable place financially if things work out as they should.

That's different than walking your high school diploma to a local store and raising a family of five on the income they pay you.

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u/wupdup May 04 '21

You can save your kids from a much harder life than yours by taking precautions now to not have them. (Will take my downvotes for truth.)

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u/skippyfa May 04 '21

His name? Alan Mathews

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u/earfullofcorn May 04 '21

Exactly what I thought of!!! :D

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u/Channel250 May 04 '21

Yeah. Except everyone likes Alan, in fact I'd say he's in the top 3-5 TV dads.

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u/airlew May 04 '21

Most likely a union grocery store. Those are getting more and more rare

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

I THINK it was Sobeys. But I don't know for sure.

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u/sevenstaves May 04 '21

It's almost like a fair livable wage would solve America's labor force going to immigrants or overseas.

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u/TheConboy22 May 04 '21

It's almost like it's by design...

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u/bolerobell May 04 '21

More like evolution and short sightedness. I don't think our grandparents and parents purposefully sought to create an awful employment environment for their offspring.

I think they wanted theirs and didn't give a moments thought to what the politicians they were electing would do to the work environment.

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u/Dr-P-Ossoff May 04 '21

Yep, to turn US into a 3rd world country. I dimly recall the first step in 1978. The WWII bosses wanted us all to become middle class, cuz that is where the action is, economic, social, invention, etc.

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u/fenringsfavor May 04 '21

Oh, that sounds good! I’d like one outrage de jour and a side-salad, please! Only $17.50, what a steal!

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u/mrdevil413 May 04 '21

Funny. HS ish time period my buddy and I used to go this diner because simple breakfast was 1.85$. Two years ago I stopped going to my breakfast spot here because an omelette with a side of potatoes and a side of fruit and no bread went up to 17.00$.
Sorry if typing that on mobile gives anyone a stroke

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u/bolerobell May 04 '21

Ok. I'll have the managers special: the half outrage de jour and the half salad. Oh and a diet coke, please.

What's that? You serve Pepsi products. Okay, never mind, cancel my order.

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u/AhoyPalloi May 04 '21

Inflation is hard to understand. It's why old out-of-touch management will fight against giving skilled college graduates 50k salaries.

I like to bring up the calculator whenever I'm feeling out-of-touch, and say... oh, that would have been less than $25k when I got out of college.

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

Wages are different in different places... 50K here would be unacceptable I made well over 60k as a laborer back in like 2009 lol.

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u/cdxxmike May 04 '21

We are talking real money not your Maple Leaf dollars.

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

So at today's exchange rate I was around 50K but at that time our money was actually worth the same and frequently more for about 4 years after i got that job so my 62K CAD was actually worth more than 62K in your unstable trash currency. Our value has also been increasing again for... 3-4 straight years.

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u/Gbcue May 04 '21

Federal minimum wage in 1972 was $1.60. Which equals $10.24 today.

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21 edited May 04 '21

I live in Canada and our minimum wage was $1.90 in 1772. which is $12.28 in todays dollars and higher than the minimum wage in MOST provinces today...

EDIT: I would fix my typo but honestly It's just too funny to change that.

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u/Nerddom13 May 04 '21

Your great-great-great-great-great-great grandparents must have been loaded!

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

I don't know about that far back but adjusted for inflation to 2011 dollars the median income was 68k in 1980 but only 58k in 2003 🤷‍♂️

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u/fnatikk50 May 04 '21

$1.90 in 1772 was in your root comment

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

Holy shit that's quite a typo... My bad, could you fucking imagine haha.

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

The difference is the percentage of people making minimum wage... Even college grads in some fields make minimum now and my grandfather made nearly $3 an hour working at a grocery store...

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u/Invideeus May 04 '21

Yea it's like john thune getting on tv and saying 15 dollars for a min wage is too much because he made 6 when he was young flipping burgers.... But that 6 dollars buying power flipping burgers back then is the same as the 20 I make now switching rail cars for a chemical plant. It's fucking absurd.

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

Right? Aside from inflation prices went up too anyway lol.

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u/Invideeus May 04 '21

Or people that like to blame our generation for being lazy. If I could make 20 bucks flipping burgers I would have no problem getting two jobs doing that to really make some bank. Scheduling conflicts aside there's no way I could do that with an industrial job like I have. I would be waaaaay to fucking worn out physically and mentally.

The money's not the only thing that's not there for us, it's the opportunity as well.

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u/nursekitty22 May 04 '21

Yes and doesn’t take into consideration the massive inflation of real estate, food, basic necessities, etc. We are smart with our money and make $140,000 combo household income and have a decent house but I still buy so much stuff second hand and am always making sure we are wise with our money. And I never buy nice shit and we drive older vehicles that are both second hand.

Also, it’s fucked what we are seeing houses go for right now. The house down the road sold for $150K over asking price!!!! It’s honestly depressing for my kids. We set them up already for saving for their future houses in some low risk stocks and they’re only 2 , hahaha. Fuck!! Life is so expensive!!

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u/eaja May 04 '21

tell you kids, back in my day, we had it so rough... or so much better, i can't tell anymore. anyway, every day, we would wake up at 2 in the morning and go to the table for breakfast. we all lived in a closet, you see, so it was one room. and we would ask, me and my 64 brothers and 27 sisters, "what's for breakfast mum?". she would smack us all with a shoe and say "cold beans". and if we complained and said "but we had cold beans yesterday" - because we had cold beans every day - she would smack us all five times with a shoe and say "tough its all we can afford. i'm trying to feed a family of 93 with just half a silver buckington", a silver buckington was about the same as half a penny back in the day. then we would head to school. we met up with the johnson kids from down the road, and walked the 1674 miles to school. on the way to school, we had to walk up a mountain so tall it extended to outer space. when we got to the top of the mountain, we would see the peterson boys on their fancy bikes - which they dont make like they used to, and we would race them down the mountain. then, when we got to school at 4 in the morning, the headmaster would come up to us and say "you bloody kids are late", then he would smack us all with the cane 10 times and tell us we had 7 years of detention. then, we went to class, and mr stevenson would say "ok line up kids", then he would spank us each 60 times, then hit us each with the cane 40 times each. then it was 7 at night and we had to walk home. then, when we got home, we'd ask "whats for dinner mum?", and she'd smack us each 50 times with a pan and say "rotten cabage". and if we complained, she would smack us each 100 times with a broom and say "im trying to feed a family of 154 on just one islet sliver, just you wait until your dad gets home" - now an islet silver was worth about as much as a grain of sand. then, when our dad got home from his job at the soot factory, he would hit us all 180 times with his belt. if we had been naughty, we would hit us all another 600 times. then, at 1:58, mum would say "ok time for bed". then, we got into our potato sacks, and she would hit us each with a shoe 8 times before we went to sleep. on saturdays, we went down to uncle bob's farm to work. we would have to walk 345 miles to the bus stop, then catch the route 4 bus for 56 stops. we would get on the bus and pay our fare of 3 teddy roses - now a teddy rose is worth about the same as a flake of skin. then, if the ticket inspector came to us, he would hit us all 4 times with his baton. if any of us had lost our ticket, we would hit us all 10 times again and throw us off the bus and we had to walk the rest of the way. when we got to the farm, uncle bob would drive to the gate in his tractor, hit us all 780 times with his crowbar, and tell us to get in his trailer so he could drive us to the farm house. then, we had to plow the fields with a toothbrush in the blazing summer heat - now, they dont make summers like they used to, so it was about 1345.4 degrees spencer, or 67 degrees centigrade using your new-fangled metric system. then, we would have to milk the cows - now, they dont make cows like they used to, so each cow weighed about 459 hog's heads, or 3.2 tonnes in your new-fangled metric system. if you touched a cows udder, it would kick you and you would die, so you had to be really careful when you milked the cows. then, when we were done, uncle bob would say "ok kids time for your pocket money". he would give us each 9 copper jemimahs - which are worth about one political promise each - and beat us each 6 times with his tractor before we left. on sundays, we would meet the johnson boys and go down to the river - now, they don't make rivers like they used to, so this river was about as wide as the whole of america, and as deep as the marianas trench, and it was filled with liquid tungsten. we would play by the old oak tree near the river, climbing on it and building tree houses and such. now - they don't make trees like they used to, so this tree had a trunk as thick as a city, and was tall enough that the branches on the top could scrape the moon. one day, little jimmy fell from the top of the tree. when he hit the ground, the only bit of his body we could recognise was his left eyeball. we picked up all his bits and rushed him to the doctors surgery. dr james said "oh its just a scratch little jimmy dont worry pop a plaster on it and you'll be right" and he gave little jimmy a plaster and a lollipop and he was ok. after we finished playing by the river, we would go into town and get some candy. now, back in the day, you could give the shopkeeper one bronze winglet - which is worth about as much as a ciggarette butt - and he would give you the entire stock of the store. so we would go and get our candy, and we'd go into the town square and eat it. now, we didn't have any of your fancy food laws back in the day, so there was all kinds of stuff in our candy. bleach, lsd, ecstasy, you name it. so we would always get a little hyper after our candy. one day, when we were hyper, we went up the mr boris's car, the only car in the town, and touched it. as we touched it, we saw dad storming down the street holding his belt. "you kids, having fun while i work all day in the soot factory just so you can have grilled water for tea every night, i oughta smack you all". we were sure he was going to smack us, but then he said "no, i got a better idea, ill take you to see mr henderson, he'll set ya right". now, dad had told us about mr henderson. mr henderson was a veteran from the great war, where he got a really bad injury, but we never knew what it was. dad walked us all down to the pub, and we saw a left testicle propped up on a pegleg. "mr henderson," said dad, "i have some kids here who need a good whooping". then, mr henderson picked up the entire pub, and hit us each 4006 times with it. then, dad said "right, i gotta go back to the soot factory, you kids run on home now". now, by now it was 1pm, which meant it was curfew. while we were walking out of the town square, we heard a man shout "oi you bloody kids, its curfew". we turned around and saw the constable holding his baton. he hit us each 160265 times with his baton, then put us in gaol for 60123865 years. now - they don't make gaols like they used to - this one had 5 mile thick steel walls, and a single hole in the top let in some light. we were in there for about 13526 years, until mum baked the constable some cardboard pie so he would let us out. then, she hit us all 1292 times with a washboard, and grounded us for the rest of our lives. so don't you come complaining to me about nonsense like not playing in dirt or broken glass, pathetic.

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u/pfabs May 04 '21

Minimum wages was 1.62 in 1972. That's about $10.14 in today's wages.

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

BTW I live in Canada and our minimum wage was $1.90 in 1772. which is $12.28 in todays dollars and higher than the minimum wage in MOST provinces today...

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

I live in Canada and our minimum wage was $1.90 in 1772. which is $12.28 in todays dollars and higher than the minimum wage in MOST provinces today...

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u/[deleted] May 04 '21

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

Haha yea that's a good point. Luckily later on in life he ended up with some government job so his pension is pretty decent.

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u/Narrative_Causality May 04 '21

Oh man, my dad loves pulling that one with me. He worked his ass off for $2.50 an hour when he was teen and hates that I'm complaining about $9 an hour and it's like....I know he knows what the concept of inflation is, because he's always bitching about it, so, like, what the fuck?

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

I actually had one of my grandfather's friends explain it to me one time as they explicitly knew at the time that we were not going to be able to afford homes and vehicles and they understood in the 60s that the only way we would have land or homes is if it was handed down to us... Pretty greasy way of doing things if you ask me.

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u/Kurotan May 04 '21

Honestly, by the time we get $15 minimum, we will have to start arguing for like $30 minimum or something.

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u/stopthecirclejerc May 04 '21 edited May 04 '21

There are infinitely more significant and poignant arguments against mandated federal minimum wage laws. It's a nuanced subject, but ultimately, like most of what bureaucracy get's involved with -- raising a federal minimum wage to $15 would hurt most, those who you think it would protect/save.

First and foremost, the experience of a 'first job' for teenagers cannot be understated. Let's say you run a tire repair shop, where you currently pay your employees $20.00 an hour. The work is hard, and you don't tolerate laziness. You have a tight group of 10 guys on staff. Yet you can hire a kid fresh out of highschool for $10.50 an hour, he can prove himself to work hard, and boom - instant career after a brief 'apprenticeship' period, where's hes making $20 an hour. The apprentice aspect of hiring youth should always exist, and you should be able to hire 14 yearolds for $5/hr, 18 yearolds for $10/hr, etc. This also translates a bit to those who do not have command of the language, ex-felons, rehabilitated drug addicts, etc.

Secondly, there are radically different cost structures involved in real estate, food, cost of living -- in rural red state v. elitist blue urban sprawl. An apartment in the boonies of Iowa, might run $550.00 per month, where a smaller apartment in San Francisco is $2700.00 per month. The cost of living is drastically different -- and thus the market is better suited to determine 'liveable wage' in each respective area. On a localized, business-to-business level. You would bankrupt what's left of the small businesses in America. And everyone would be a $15/hr slave at an Amazon or Walmart facility, as the lower-middle class slides into oblivion. Small business and competitive markets is a good thing. Monopolistic giants are not. For a variety of micro/macro-economic reasons.

Finally, and in my opinion most importantly -- the past is prologue -- minimum wage laws were passed it took the most employed demographic in America (Black, Male, Youth - 18-25), and within three years they were the least employed demographic in America (Black, Male, Youth, 18-25). And this 'increased' minimum wage was less drastic than a $15/hr proposal. Those that you think it would save (zoomers, millennials) - it ends up burying. Note, that this was all before you added illegal immigration into the mix. Regardless of whatever news source you follow, the collectively and knowingly deceitful lie of '11-12 million illegal immigrants in America' & '350,000 illegal immigrants per year' is laughably incorrect. Hell we might have truly eclipsed +1,400,000 already this year alone. There are about 28,000,000-35,000,000 undocumented/semi-documented TIN illegal immigrants working in this country. The impact this has to both the social services and welfare system is one thing -- the deflationary impact it has on lower tier jobs? Is another.

So do not ask for '15/hr so that you can own a house like gramps'. Because if they raise federal minimum wages to 15/hr, houses will only spike further, as will bread, milk, eggs, cellphone bills, etc. Inflation is here. But how bad it gets is up to the Biden Administrations ability to curtail the endless and hazardous (read: excessively wasteful) spending/debts. Pro Tip: It's gonna get alot worse. Plan accordingly.

If you want to earn more, work harder. No vacations. No sick days. Find a company that you see people making money at. Tell them you will lick the floor clean to get a job there. Once you do, earn it every day. First in and last out. Within 5 years, you will be successful. Don't miss a day. Don't take a day off. Work.

If you are a woman, you can most likely ignore everything I have said.

Be well.

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u/brickmack May 04 '21

The weird thing about inflation is how uneven it is though. Like, 50 years ago even relatively poor people could buy a house and a car, but everything else kinda sucked. Now, even the dirt poor have phones more powerful than entire countries a few decades ago, our food quality would've stunned kings a century ago, etc, but even the middle class struggle to afford decent housing

If you went back in time and showed someone a cellphone, they'd probably ne more surprised that you can buy one for only about a day's wage than that it exists at all.

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u/bluechimera May 04 '21 edited May 04 '21

But the real problem isn't the wage... it is housing costs! if the gov really wanted to help, they would write laws about the outright gouging of prices of apartments and houses! All that is going to happen if they raise the wage is: businesses will raise prices to make up the difference, and bam.. right back where we were!

Also, costs depend heavily on locality... when I lived in Greenbelt, Maryland, I paid $1150 a month for a 780 Sqft 1 bdrm 1 bath apartment... insane!

I moved to Martinsburg, West Virginia and got a 1400 Sqft 2 bdrm 1 1/2 bath townhouse for $950 a month. (They had smaller units for $750) I bought a 1996 built 3 bdrm, 2 bath house on 1.34 acres of property outside Martinsburg, for $179,500 in 2018 (mortgage is currently $1130).

My coworker lives in Rockville Maryland area, and his house is much older, in worse shape, and on a small lot maybe a quarter of an acre, and he paid $380,000

Federal min wage doesn't need to go up to $15/hour maybe for certain locales, but not nation-wide!

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

Actually... when our minimum wage went from 11-15 an hour over only like 3 years grocery and home prices DROPPED they didn't increase lol. Grocery store profits actually went up too my mother was a department manager at the time and I remember it was the only time in my life I had seen grocery prices drop lol. More people buying products outweighed the added wage cost by quite a bit. I think she said something like wage cost went up roughly 30% and weekly sales increased by nearly 40%.

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u/bluechimera May 04 '21

Sorry, Reddit is in a black hole... but I edited my original post several times since the black hole emerged, so take a peek lol
I can say that I could see people spending more than the employer pays out, but still disagree with a nation-wide increase. Also consider the off-balance shift of every other employee who is now closer to min wage.. and will want a compensation hike too.
for the U.S. $15 nation-wide means the wage increase will be slightly over double from $7.25 to $15 ($7.75), quite a bit more for us, than your $4 increase.
Also, and I mean no offense, but Canada has roughly 11.5% of the population that the U.S. has.
I don't see it happening overnight... but it would unbalance again, and we will be back in the same predicament in time. I just did a quick Google assistant search for what causes inflation... in simple terms, it replied: Inflation can occur when there are production costs increases, such as raw materials and *wages*.

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

Population has absolutely nothing to do with it our governments are almost entirely provincial and my city has the same density as any regular million plus city across the United States.

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u/Dirty-Ears-Bill May 04 '21

My dad somehow got the sweetest job in the world apparently in high school. Worked at a grocery store and made $12/hour in the 70s. He bought like 3 different cars in that time

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

Holy shit! lol

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u/IguanaTabarnak May 04 '21

And, furthermore, where's the virtue in being underpaid? I made $6.40 an hour at my first job in 1992, and I was being criminally underpaid then, regardless of what that's worth in today's dollars. My kids deserve a decent wage for their time and I won't begrudge them at all for not getting taken advantage of as badly as I was.

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

Honestly the largest argument I keep hearing against raising minimum wage is honestly that people that make a few dollars over minimum... Simply don't want lower paid people making as much as they do. It's literally a case of "I need to make more than them to feel good about myself a quote relating to that that will always stick with me is

"The only time you look in your neighbor's bowl is to make sure that they have enough. You don't look in your neighbor's bowl to make sure you have as much as them."

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u/userlivewire May 04 '21

“No it’s not. Do your homework” -Grandpa probably.

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u/AdequateOne May 04 '21

He was doing pretty good, minimum wage in 1972 was $1.60.

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u/AverageCanadianGuy May 04 '21

In Canada where we live it was $1.90

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u/gtnover May 04 '21

We are better off financially than they were even in 1972. I've included a video of a professor of economics who has done all the work. The relevant part of the video starts at 8:52.

https://youtu.be/4J5s6aZCPSg

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u/Tools4toys May 04 '21

Well paying job then! My first job in 1972 was $1.25, then got a raise to $1.40. I was in heaven when I finally earned $1.75.

I understand the $!5.00 an hour minimum wage, and think it's appropriate - but:

My concern is that I'm on Social Security, and I don't think we'll see an equivalent increase in SS payments and my pension, like many other people's is a set amount. At my age, I know a lot of people are in the same situation, who retired some years ago. Social Security payments are based on your past income, so even someone that was doing great in 1995 at $65K annually, is now on a SS payment of $1400 a month, and their pension, just like mine is fixed too. The problem you mention of $3 an hour and inflation being somewhere around $15 an hour, also affects all these people who retired years ago. The minimum wage was $4.25 in 1995, so with the average inflation since then of approximately 2.15%, the price of items which $4.25 could buy then has increased to $7.40.
Remember, their pension hasn't increased, and SS COLA adjustments haven't kept up with inflation, just like the minimum wage and you'll see how the government has altered the COLA calculations to minimize the effect of the CPI. Look up 'chained CPI', which is used to calculate the inflation rate for Social Security.

Now, how do you address the impact on senior citizens when you suddenly inflate the CPI with a new minimum wage? Increase your Social Security (FICA) tax?

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u/genoasalamisandwhich May 04 '21

Gramps doesn’t understand things he doesn’t understand

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u/yabukothestray May 04 '21

My aunt, who is also a boomer, has this mentality with the cost of college. She barely paid anything to go to nursing (private) college & get her BSN. She only had to work over the summer to pay for tuition. She’s like, “I paid off college on my own for $3/hr, you’re clearly just not working hard enough if you can’t afford it.” Oh and she tries to spin it like she had it worse / gatekeep financial struggle.

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u/1337butterfly May 04 '21

just say that because immigrants are doing jobs for less people aren't getting paid as much.

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u/Eruharn May 04 '21

Financial compensation went up, ie your er paid premiums. YOY take home forthe bottom 25% has gone up like 10$ or something else that realistically amounts to nothing. (The top5% was seeing closer to +$1000)

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u/SlovakWelder May 04 '21

ya mom, thats why Im eating cup noodles

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u/Low_on_camera_funds May 04 '21

Wages sinc the 90s have gone from $4 to $12 but housing has gone from 60k to 500 k plus so min wage increased 3x but minimum housing increase 9x

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u/redjfkldje May 04 '21

No but they people’s demands for a house rapidly outpaced wage increases, that’s the issue. The people in the 60s and 70s lived in single story ranch houses. People today claim that’s too small so we are stuck with 2000+ sqft two story houses. That’s what people forget when they do the whole home price and wage comparison.

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