r/Damnthatsinteresting May 12 '21

Ethical way of farming pearls. Video

30k Upvotes

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u/TheActualCanadian May 12 '21

Aliens arrive on Earth, and 40 years later

“Hey, GARGHTHALUHGRHH, what’s that around your neck?”

“Oh, you like it? It’s Kidney Stones, 100% real.”

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u/murphysmashrobot May 12 '21

Nothing screams romance louder than a kidney stone birfed from a tiny pee hole... except maybe the person who birfed it.

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u/Laiiam May 12 '21

Birf

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u/murphysmashrobot May 12 '21

Birf me em stones!

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u/One5e May 12 '21

Ladies, get yourself a man who’ll pee you a necklace

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u/murphysmashrobot May 12 '21

No way, he doesn’t love you unless it’s genuine kidney stones!

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u/Fox-One_______ May 12 '21

I can kinda pee out a pearl necklace

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u/Juhboobles May 13 '21

You'll NEVER get em that way Thanos

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u/joeboticus May 13 '21

Standing over the toilet going ROMAAAAAAANCE!!

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u/rmrfcsk May 12 '21

I like the alien's name. So poetic.

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u/youcanwaitanotherday May 13 '21

As someone currently trying to pass a kidney stone, this made me cringe a little too hard.

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u/budsis May 13 '21

As someone with A LOT of experience birthing kidney stones....ask for Toradol. Works WAY better than narcotics...not that that narcotic buzz doesn't help offer some form of relief. They won't give it to you often because it is hard on your liver but they will give it in your IV. Lots of liquids and anti inflammatory meds. Toradol is like super charged Ibuprofen. Wishing you 'safe passage' my friend. ♡

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u/HalfWorm May 13 '21

As an ER nurse, I agree. Toradol is a magic bullet for kidney stone pain. I see people come in puking from the pain feeling tip top after 15mg of Toradol. Hard on your kidneys after repetitive use though. Not so much your liver.

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u/TheActualCanadian May 13 '21

Best of luck my friend lol

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u/xAlice_Liddell May 13 '21

"Glad you like them. I've been making fine jewellery for years, apparently." -Zoidberg

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u/KingOfTheWild-Things May 13 '21

"ewwww, you're touching them!"

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u/Barrelofmonkeez May 13 '21

GARHTHALUHGRHH: "Let me show you how to harvest them the ethical way"

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u/Symcathico May 12 '21

If i would have a award, i would give it to you. That's my kind of humor. You made me laugh hard on the toilet XD

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u/TheActualCanadian May 12 '21

Glad I made you laugh brother. Definitely my first post with a response like this lol

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u/---knaveknight--- May 12 '21

Hurray, I’ve been making beautiful jewelry for years!

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u/OkImpression3204 May 12 '21 edited May 13 '21

To everyone commenting, GIA and Mikimoto both offer free, fairly concise briefings on how this process works. Pearls cannot be synthesized in the same way that diamonds and sapphires can, due to the nature of producing nacre which is produced by the mollusk itself. Each of these oysters (these are not clams, although clams can produce pearls) can only produce around 3 pearls before it dies from stress. Due to this average the third pearl is extracted by ripping the entire shell apart (while the animal is alive) so that the shell can be crushed up and used to seed new oysters.

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u/JakeFromMontana May 13 '21

Wait, do oysters just grow from crushed up oysters.

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u/Alex_Sherby May 13 '21

Exactly like human babies !

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u/Ho_Fart May 13 '21

Someone give this man some gold!

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u/EvernightStrangely May 13 '21

Not the oysters. How pearls are made is some irritant like sand or crushed up shell ends up inside the oyster's soft insides. The oyster can't expel it, so it wraps it in layers of minerals it naturally produces so it doesn't scratch up its insides. I may be completely wrong on this, because I remember being told this a long time ago.

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u/robert_stacks_pecker May 13 '21

So their like tonsil stones for oysters

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u/EvernightStrangely May 13 '21

Yes and no. Tonsil stones is calcified bacteria, pearls are not.

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u/robert_stacks_pecker May 13 '21

Our human vessels are truly disgusting

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u/EvernightStrangely May 13 '21

I can't really disagree with that.

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u/Robertroo May 13 '21

This is the answer i came to the comments for.

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u/OkImpression3204 May 13 '21

Not in the sense you are thinking of. Oyster larvae, like all bivalves, are free-swimming organisms that need to anchor themselves to a sturdy surface so they can filter food from the water. Mussel shells are used in a similar way in their cultivation. To clarify, when I said crushed I did not mean pulverized into a sand or powder, I meant broken into smaller chunks.

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u/TheSpartyn May 13 '21

but what does it actually do?? what do the shell chunks do

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u/OkImpression3204 May 13 '21

It provides an anchor point for the infant bivalve.

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u/TheSpartyn May 13 '21

so its basically just a structure for them to hook onto? why cant they just use a rock or something

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u/OkImpression3204 May 13 '21

Because they already paid to grow the oyster, it’s cheaper to use the shells than to pay for rocks. The spawn are cultivated in large tanks and not in the open ocean.

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u/_music_mongrel May 13 '21

Who are you, who are so wise in the ways of mollusks?

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u/FukkleberryHin May 13 '21

He's the guy from Ween

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u/Bardivan May 13 '21

Mutilated lips give a kiss on the wrist Of the worm like tips of tentacles expanding In my mind, I'm fine, accepting only fresh brine You can get another drop of this, yeah you wish

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u/TheSpartyn May 13 '21

i see, basically recycling. kinda fucked up though

thanks for the explanation

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u/OkImpression3204 May 13 '21

It’s incredibly fucked up. They do the same thing for clams, mussels, and scallops. The same ones you get in the supermarket.

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u/[deleted] May 13 '21 edited 5d ago

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u/Whispersoft51 May 13 '21

the circle of life

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u/BoysenberryVisible58 May 13 '21

Basically baby oysters in the wild grow often grow on the shells of other oysters. They need something to anchor do and other oyster shells are really good for that. When you harvest oysters you drop the shells back into the back after so the next generation of oysters can grow on them.

Source: grew up on an island with both wild and cultivated oysters.

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u/roofuskit May 13 '21

The components of the shell can be recycled by the mollusks. Like when you feed egg shells to your chickens to help them produce more egg shells.

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u/robert_stacks_pecker May 13 '21

My chickens unionized; I can’t feed them parts of their babies anymore

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u/scarbrought93 May 13 '21

You're gonna have to back up to that last sentence for me.

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u/TornadoAlley580 May 13 '21

When you feed chickens eggshells they can use the calcium from them to essentially add more calcium to their system and own eggs. Sometimes chickens will start eating whole eggs of there is a deficiency of calcium. Chickens are omnivores and eat all sorts of stuff including eggs, meat, and dairy. You know how goats have a reputation for eating everything? Chickens eat almost everything too.

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u/Nie915 May 13 '21

Everyone talks about how they go nuts over a watermelon. There is nothing more entertaining than watching them go after a pile of leftover spaghetti! Can confirm, chickens eat (almost) everything. And Love Love chicken nuggets. Only thing mine won't eat is left over sausage gravy.

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u/filthypatheticsub May 13 '21

You ever feel weird about feeding them chicken?

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u/DonPepe64 May 13 '21

They can begin to eat each other if deprived of food for long enough

Edit: Chickens in general that is, not necessarily the chickens of the person who you are responding to

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u/tampora701 May 13 '21

That doesn't sound ethical at all, if your goal is to care about the mollusk.

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u/OkImpression3204 May 13 '21

It’s not ethical, I’m a professional in the jewelry industry, specializing in high karat golds and platinum, and I can tell you from experience 90% of the “sustainable” labels and environmental certifications you see from companies are for purely marketing and don’t actually make a substantive difference in the total impact of a process or product. There are some exceptions but this is not one.

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u/waitingforsnacks May 13 '21

Do you have any recommendations of companies you vouch for?

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u/OkImpression3204 May 13 '21

Unfortunately it’s a conflict of interest for me to recommend any specific company. They all have flaws despite intent because businesses have to make profit at the end of the day. The high energy usage and waste created just from manufacturing creates a major hurdle when it comes to jewelry ever being truly “sustainable”. If I were to recommend truly sustainable jewelry I’d tell you to bleach the bones of an animal that died of natural causes, carve them, and tie it to a cord made of its hide. That’s about as low impact as it can get.

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u/vkIMF May 13 '21

Insert Deathklok meme: "Brutal"

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u/My-LGS-Really-Sucks May 13 '21

The classic Shark Tooth Necklace

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u/Gockdaw May 13 '21

Who would have thought an industry which mines and exploits resources would be unethical?

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u/Skis1227 May 13 '21

As a QA in the food manufacturing and dietary supplement industries: same thing with food. And to be completely frank, certifications are just paid auditing agencies. They want your money. My last place should've been shut down. But we had a myriad of certifications, a couple of which, NSF & QAI. If anyone really wants to know what they are consuming, they need to shop closer to the source.

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u/Magnedon May 13 '21

Yeah that would be like if you harvested the beef from cows while they were still alive so it was all "cool" because they're still living, but then for their last harvesting you ripped them apart and ground them up anyway

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u/[deleted] May 13 '21

And fed it to other cows

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u/Magnedon May 13 '21

Ah yes I forgot the cherry on top, soilent green.

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u/PezRystar May 13 '21

That part is already a thing. It's where mad cow disease came from.

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u/Farmer_j0e00 May 13 '21

Kind of sounds like chicken. Steal their eggs everyday and then fry it up for dinner once they stop producing eggs.

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u/tampora701 May 13 '21

Chickens dont die from the stress of having their eggs taken, though.

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u/TheVictoryHawk May 12 '21

That's pretty metal

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u/wackygoose May 13 '21

So how is it ethical again?

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u/OkImpression3204 May 13 '21

It’s not.

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u/wildartichokes May 13 '21

You dont think killing 1/3 the number of oysters for the same amount of pearl is ethical? I'd definitely say it's an improvement at least.

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u/[deleted] May 13 '21 edited 25d ago

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u/JoeSicko May 13 '21

It's better for the oyster 67% of the time.

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u/booi May 13 '21

Instructions unclear, snorted some oyster shell powder

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u/VanLuisBomb May 12 '21

Ex-pearl farmer here. This proccess has nothing to do with "ethical" farming. You re-seed the pearl 3 times in its 10 year life then kill it on the 3rd pearl. You keep it alive and re-seed because as the shell grows you can get a bigger pearl each cycle.

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u/HulloHoomans May 13 '21

So, if each individual produces 3 pearls of generally predictable sizes, then why are the large pearls so much more expensive than the small ones? Does the time to harvest grow for each pearl?

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u/roofuskit May 13 '21

10 year life

It takes ten years to get that bigger pearl. And although they said bigger, they didn't imply that there was anything consistent about it other than the increase in size

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u/HulloHoomans May 13 '21

No it doesn't take 10 years for the 3rd pearl, which is exactly why I asked the question.

If each pearl takes a little over 3 years, then the cost of producing each pearl is the same. The only reason larger pearls would be more expensive in this case would be if not all of the oysters lived for the full 10 years, meaning you'd have a smaller supply of the bigger pearls.

But if the first pearl takes 2 years, the second 3 years, and the 3rd takes 5 years, then there's a growing cost of production for each tier of pearl size. Add crop lost to early deaths and you compound increased production costs with greater scarcity.

So which is it, does each pearl take longer and longer to produce, is it just crop loss, or is it totally arbitrary like the cost of diamonds, one of the most common rocks on the planet?

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u/JHoney1 May 13 '21

I mean you could literally just blame it on demand for larger pearls.

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u/hugefukinanimetits May 13 '21

Some probably die before the third pearl & larger demand for larger pearls

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u/wje100 May 13 '21

But you have to go through the first 2 steps to get the big one. I could add a new tank and have the small ones in 3 years, then the medium ones in 6, if I want big ones it will always take the full time.

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u/VonBeegs May 13 '21

So...are oysters sentient? Or is pearl farming one into stress death like cutting off tree limbs until they die?

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u/ThankMisterGoose May 13 '21

They have no brain or nervous system, so I would say they are not. But even plants can scream, so it depends whether you want to take that distinction beyond the most widely accepted definition of sentience. I assume that oysters similarly will have some sort of response to harmful stimuli.

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u/Nerve13 May 13 '21

Asking the real questions here.

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u/Black_Skimmer May 13 '21

Why kill it?

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u/roofuskit May 13 '21

Because it typically dies from stress after the third one.

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u/[deleted] May 13 '21 edited 19d ago

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u/LuxCrawford May 12 '21

I think the world you’re looking for is SUSTAINABLE simply because they aren’t killing them to get the pearls and can continuously make more pearls by adding another irritant in the clam. They are however potentially injuring the clams by prying them open and fiddling around inside. There nothing particularly ethical about this method.

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u/EmpsKitchen May 12 '21

Good points. Watching the video progress, I thought to myself... Is it, though? Maybe the video should be titled, "A More Ethical Way". Who am I, though.

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u/rmgxy May 12 '21

You are EmpsKitchen. Never let anyone tell you otherwise.

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u/seeingglass May 12 '21

Somehow, this warmed my heart. I feel... easily manipulated.

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u/jyn8462 May 12 '21

Your feelings are valid and you have a right to them, don't let anyone tell you otherwise

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u/mapguy May 12 '21

Can I interest you in an extended car warranty?

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u/hermaneldering May 12 '21

Don't be fooled by u/rmgxy you are EmpsBedroom.

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u/Gdiworog May 12 '21

And I think the word you are looking for is word.

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u/heimeyer72 May 12 '21

Thank you. I was asking (myself) "Where's the ethic in that?" Granted, it's still better than killing the clam (IMHO) but still f'ing stressful and uh, "terrifying" to it.

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u/tbscotty68 May 12 '21

I'm definitely in favor of respecting all living things, but bivalves don't have brains or central nervous systems, so I don't think that they can experience stress or terror in any sense of the words...

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u/punarob May 12 '21

I've been a strict vegan for 30 years, and also a scientist. Even Peter Singer, the author of Animal Liberation and ethicist has gone back and forth over the years as to whether or not it's ethical to eat oysters for exactly this reason. There is no reason to even suspect they have any level of consciousness or more so than many plants.

It takes many years for oysters to get that large so those who farm them don't want to kill them or that's one less oyster to make the most valuable pearls.

Personally I don't eat oysters (because eww) but don't see any ethical problem with eating them in farmed settings where they aren't being removed from their ecosystems in nature.

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u/mcjenzington May 13 '21

You are legit, sir. Respect.

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u/Ransnorkel May 13 '21

Huh, I don't think I've heard of other animals without brains besides jellyfish. Besides some other molluscs(?) do you know what else doesn't have a brain/nervous system?

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u/dongasaurus May 13 '21

Sea anemones, sponges, starfish, urchins, coral, sea cucumber, probably a few others

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u/shanna99 May 12 '21

I always wonder about that though, like is that actually true or is it that they just experience things and feelings in a way that we don’t understand? I wish I knew the answer.

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u/Yanagibayashi May 12 '21

Another interesting perspective is if we consider beings above us. If some alien race had the intelligence and technology to conquer entire galaxies is search of resources and came to harvest earth, would they even notice us? And if they did, would they consider us "conscious', or would they see us the same way we see things like bivalves or ants or something like that.

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u/thefarstrider May 12 '21

Have you read Ender’s Game?

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u/Yanagibayashi May 12 '21

I did, but I don't remember much given I read it in junior high.

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u/HmmThatisDumb May 12 '21

The consciousness of the bugs and the way they communicate, additionally these issues are further flushed out in the following two books of the series.

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u/thefarstrider May 12 '21

It explores the idea of an alien race not recognizing us as “sentient” and the problems it causes, and is a very low-key nod to the line of reasoning you’re pointing to here. Plus it’s a super-fun read.

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u/goo_goo_gajoob May 12 '21

The Formics definitely recognized humanity as sentient. The issue was they thought we would be a hivemind like them and killing a couple humans was the equivalent of shutting off some cameras so they could study our tech in privacy before attempting further contact.

The much better example from the same series is the Father trees on Lusitania. Which were not viewed as sentient by the humans there till Ender arrived and didn't immediately dismiss the Piggies saything they talk to them like all the previous scientists did.

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u/insheets May 12 '21

Or how about reading Roadside Picnic.

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u/journey333 May 12 '21

Sort of reminded me of this Malcolm in the Middle scene that I just watched on /r/videos

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u/SansCitizen May 12 '21

Interesting. The question you're asking more or less is whether the brain creates consciousness or simply channels and possibly even restricts it.

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u/shanna99 May 12 '21

Right, like what if another species has their own equivalent of a “brain” but it’s just nothing that we know about or understand? And it’s completely different than our own brains so we come to the wrong conclusion about their sentience? It’s interesting to think about.

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u/mypretty May 12 '21

I read somewhere that an octopus’s entire body is essentially its brain... that’s how it can change shape and colour so rapidly.

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u/Ursidoenix May 12 '21

My brain can change colour?

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u/evildeadjunkie May 13 '21

I read that gators are so ornery cause they got all them teeth and no toothbrush

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u/Demon1119 May 12 '21

While there are definitely limits to our understanding of what mechanically goes on in a brain, the sheer simplicity of the structure of most bivalves brains means what they can process and “experience” is probably quite limited. As an example, the oyster probably has some form of pain or irritation receptors like us. But where our brain will react to pain with emotion, action and processing, theirs will react by opening and closing and maybe pumping extra water through their gills. That’s because there’s not much else they’re capable of doing. In the life of an oyster, they don’t need to do much else, so that’s the most they can do usually.

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u/Farmer_j0e00 May 13 '21

You could ask the same for plants I suppose.

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u/RadiantSriracha May 13 '21

Thank you! Everyone on this thread moaning about how it’s not ethical to kill the oysters, as if all of Reddit has now gone so extremist vegan that killing a mollusk is unethical.

Y’all eat chicken and cows, and consume palm oil that comes from the destruction of orangutang habitat. Settle down over the oysters.

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u/[deleted] May 12 '21

I'm vegan af but oysters don't get terrified. They don't have any central nervous system and thus don't feel pain because pain requires a place to process sensations. Honestly I would eat them if eating a filter feeder wasn't gross.

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u/[deleted] May 12 '21 edited 19d ago

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u/Mr_LIMP_Xxxx May 12 '21

Certified organic poo. Who knows what those clams were eating.

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u/Mallouwed May 12 '21

Clams dont have a central nervous system, this is about as unethical as pruning a tree.

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u/duroo May 12 '21

These also aren't clams, they're oysters.

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u/davidestroy May 12 '21

NOFX has a song about this.

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u/ShalmaneserIII May 12 '21

Injured, not injured, whatever- the things don't have a central nervous system. There's no oyster-brain to feel suffering.

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u/Houghs May 12 '21

So pearls are just tonsil stones for clams?

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u/So_Motarded May 12 '21

/r/popping about to get some new material...

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u/KingBenjamin97 May 12 '21

I regret clicking this link so fucking much. I don’t know what I expected it to be but wtf

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u/cedarcypressoak May 12 '21

Welcome! Beware, there are things on this sub that, once you’ve seen, you cannot unsee. I recommend starting with rusty pliers guy.

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u/moffsoi May 13 '21

That video gave me tetanus

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u/MysticAviator May 12 '21

I don't know much about this stuff but aren't pearls just build-ups of calcium? Why do we need oysters to do this? It seems like it'd be a whole lot more efficient to just make our own.

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u/LocalBalance May 12 '21

“Authenticity”

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u/MyFlairIsaLie May 12 '21 edited May 13 '21

Yup. Basically the same reason "real" diamonds are more expensive. It's just a flex.

Edit: I'm wrong. Pearls can't be synthesized. That would be mother-of-pearl, which I thought was the same thing until now

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u/Petal-Dance May 13 '21

...... No, you really cannot synthesize pearls like you can a real gemstone.

Gems are a chemical stacked in a crystal structure. Find the chemical, learn how to stack it, and youve made a gem.

Pearls are an organic secretion released repeatedly to cover up an irritation. Mimicking both the organic secretion, and its process of secretion and hardening, is massively complex.

Its akin to saying that we should make lab made wood, since wood is just made by taking carbon from the air and stacking it. Its way more complex than that.

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u/ShiversTheNinja May 13 '21

This should be higher...

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u/ComradeGivlUpi May 12 '21

And because one company has a monopoly on real diamonds

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u/rock_lobster576 May 12 '21

De Beers diamond cartel babyyy

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u/fault_in_theAE35unit May 12 '21

I dont think thats as true as it once was. Its like 5 companies that have equalish shares. I honestly don't think DeBeers is #1 anymore

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u/Lord_Blathoxi May 13 '21

"I can afford to buy a carved rock from a dude who uses child slave labor to dig the rocks out of the dirt!"

Weird flex, but ok.

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u/A_Very_Sus_Bush May 12 '21

I mean diamonds are just lumps of carbon, but naturally formed ones are hella expensive precisely because they're so easy to make that the natural ones have a certain pizzazz.

Humans give things arbitrary value to pretty much everything.

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u/MysticAviator May 12 '21

Actually, I brought up diamonds in another comment and pointed out how funny that industry is that they artificially limit the supply of them just to keep the price up. There are tons of diamonds in the ground ready to be mined, the companies just force them to be valuable. I will never understand why humans value inanimate objects so much. I can understand the value of gold because it's a very good conductor for electronics uses and diamonds can greatly increase the longevity of saw blades and stuff like that but it just seems stupid to me to have something just for the sake of having it.

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u/A_Very_Sus_Bush May 12 '21

Yeah, the jewelry industry is just aids in general, but hey, if you want a pretty diamond ring for someone you love, get a synthetic white sapphire instead. Looks similar, a fraction of the price.

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u/jesusmanman May 12 '21

Or a lab created diamond.

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u/worldalpha_com May 12 '21

I kept hearing commericals from a local chain, that said 20% cheaper for artisan created diamonds. I always thought they would be a lot cheaper than that.

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u/Cepheus7 May 12 '21

They are a lot cheaper than that.

But why sell something for 20% of the price of “natural” diamonds, when you can sell it for 80% and tell people they’re getting some kind of insane deal.

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u/thefarstrider May 12 '21

Historically gems, like gold, have been valuable for their ability to be place-holders for value, i.e. they make good currency, so they’re useful to facilitate trade. What makes something good for currency?

durability, portability, divisibility, uniformity, limited supply, and acceptability

Gems have all of these besides divisibility, which is why they typically have been used to “store” wealth, and only used in exchanges where large sums are necessary. Picture a “hoard of treasure” and almost certainly a pile of gold and gems come to mind. Or think of a smuggler trying to move a VERY large sum of value. What do they smuggle? Diamonds!

The history behind currency is really interesting if you ever have a few hours to spend randomly googling articles.

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u/getoutdoors66 May 12 '21

No one really cared for diamonds until the media started advertising about how beautiful they are, and started doing ads for buying your lady a diamond, and making it seem so extravagant. It amazing what happens when the media tells you what to like, and obviously that has not changed.

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u/Flatcapspaintandglue May 12 '21 edited May 12 '21

The reason certain things are valuable is because historically they have been rare and hard to obtain.

Technology is moving to the point where many previously precious metals can be synthesised in an industrial setting. Eg. Gold can be synthesised in a nuclear reactor or particle accelerator using Mercury. (But it comes out radioactive so maybe don’t give it to a fiancé you want to keep).

My point is that as technology progresses, materials which previously signified wealth will become obsolete and new status symbols will emerge, it’s happening already.

E: and yeah, when that happens “authenticity” will be the key. The price for “real” stuff will sky-rocket. Think Blade Runner and the gene-modded snake when the lady says “think I would be working in a place like this if I could afford a real snake?”

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u/teagoo42 May 13 '21

Theyre calcium carbonate in a really cool concentric crystalline structure thats really damn hard to replicate artificially.

We do have fake pearls, but theyre much less shiny and irridescent. Plus its easy as hell to farm oysters to do it for us, not much point wasting lab time when we can just stick some sand in an oyster and wait a few months.

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u/chokeslam512 May 13 '21

You can tell the difference between real and fake by rubbing th pearl on your teeth. Real ones feel grainy fake ones smooth.

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u/earth_worx May 12 '21

Good luck getting your calcium atoms to lie down in such a way as to create shiny iridescence.

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u/MistahMort May 13 '21

It is a whole lot more efficient. That’s why fake pearls still look real but are a fuck ton cheaper.

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u/[deleted] May 12 '21

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u/MCC900 May 12 '21

They don't think much. So I suppose anything that doesn't make them suffer.

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u/tbscotty68 May 12 '21

Bivalves lack brains or even central nervous systems. They are incapable of thought...

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u/ShalmaneserIII May 12 '21

No brain. No central nervous system, even. They don't think at all.

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u/medicalmosquito May 12 '21

They don’t have a CNS so I guess we’ll never know and neither will they 🙃

136

u/Pedrica1 May 12 '21

Well, it's either this which is the option where they get to keep living after the pearls have been extracted or the usual way people do it where the clams end up dead.

37

u/Dependent-Honeydew-9 May 12 '21

And processed into some variety of fertilizer?

40

u/heimeyer72 May 12 '21

Or eaten by humans.

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u/Dependent-Honeydew-9 May 12 '21

Lol. That’s actually what I meant.

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u/SweSupermoosie May 12 '21

As ethical as I feel going to my ob/gyn.

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u/NotSureNotRobot May 12 '21

I keep asking but they just clam up

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u/sugarcocks May 12 '21

ender pearl

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u/bigfranky145 May 12 '21

Cant believe I had to scroll this far to find this comment

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u/Amalchemy May 12 '21

Pretty sure they plant the irritant in there to create the pearl so I’m not sure why they are worried about ethics in the extraction.

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u/Triette May 12 '21

Personally speaking I would rather be irritated than dead. But that’s just me.🤷🏻‍♀️

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u/OpulentMerkin May 12 '21

My mother-in-law puts this principle to the test every time we're together.

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u/Dependent-Honeydew-9 May 12 '21

Did you marry my ex?

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u/Kedoki-Senpai May 12 '21

I mean. Have you ever wondered why oysters produce pearls? It's an immune response to a foreign object (e.g. parasite). Pearl farmers surgically implant objects into oysters that irritate their body and cause this immune response. I doubt it is a pleasant experience. And the farmers aren't removing the pearls from the oysters this way because it's unethical to kill it but because it's uneconomical to kill your factory.

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u/crazymcfattypants May 12 '21

I doubt it is a pleasant experience.

TBF I doubt much of a clam's experience is pleasant. If a clam's experience is a thing at all.

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u/Flyinhighinthesky May 12 '21

In fairness, pearls happen in nature quite regularly. A single grain of sand can cause pearl formation. Also the oyster doesn't likely notice it much on account of a lack of brain.

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u/Spacepotato00 May 12 '21

They have no brain and no experience so it's not really unpleasant to anything

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u/Puzzleheaded_Mark_65 May 12 '21

Pearl gynecologist

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u/bilenbilie May 12 '21

Isn't that also the economical way of farming pearls? They can produce more if they don't die?

8

u/41ia2 May 12 '21

ethical way of farming eyes of ender

7

u/yoeyz May 12 '21

And how is this ethical?

6

u/maddamleblanc May 13 '21

No such thing as "ethical" pearl harvesting. Planting irritants in an oyster isn't ethical. Not killing it doesn't equal ethical.

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u/Kaiser-32 May 12 '21

There is not a single bit of the video that makes me think of "ethical". Not the pin or the platter, even less the pliers and the "clamstand".

23

u/sirwillups May 12 '21

It's an oysterstand

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u/Stoopen8 May 12 '21

This is so cruel! All you need to do is wait for the clam to sleep underwater then when it snores extract it with a submarine equipped with a metal clamp.

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u/joh2138535 May 13 '21

I'd say sustainable more than ethical

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u/No-Newspaper-7699 May 12 '21

Well considering most oysters die when the shell is opened and the fact that they remove the pearl this way only for species that can create multiple pearls, there is not a lot of ethics here.

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u/para_chan May 12 '21

If they die when the shell is opened, how to they place the irritant that becomes a cultured pearl?

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u/Indian_Here May 12 '21

By opened he means ripping them open. Irritant can be fed with a tiny gap.

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u/Kamiiruruma May 12 '21

Nothing ethical about this at all. If ethics were to be considered simply do not farm them then. Do we really need pearls other than for mere jewellery?

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u/Extension-Chance-523 May 12 '21

This is just the way they farm pearls isn't it? Older oysters often produce higher quality pearls, so ethics aside I think the farmer just want maintain their stock / get older oysters to produce higher quality pearls.

10

u/QuantumButtz May 12 '21

You know what's even more ethical? Not farming pearls. Who tf wears them anymore anyway?

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u/Verumero May 12 '21

Everybody feeling so bad for oysters lol. They dont have a nervous system, they don’t in any conceivable way feel the irritant, the removal process, or death.

This thread is logically consistent with being upset by scraping the barnacles off a boat.

Also it’s not even about sustainability really as eating oysters kills magnitudes more. It’s about efficiency and cost.

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u/RevRaven May 12 '21

Does anyone really care about the plight of the oyster?

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u/jsting May 12 '21

I'm sitting here wondering if anyone else is confused by this. These invertebrates are not endangered, no central nervous system, spawn by the millions and most get eaten as wee little babies.

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u/beermoney304 May 12 '21

At first I thought those were some gnarly popsicles

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u/mooseisloose14 May 12 '21

Lots of good comments, but that is an oyster, not clam

3

u/rozzy27 May 12 '21

Oysters just goin to the dentist

3

u/Ok_Industry5798 May 12 '21

If it's not yours, don't take it? I honestly don't see the point in harvesting it!

3

u/Frosty2433 May 12 '21

What makes this ethical vs. a different method? Genuine question.

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u/Groudie May 13 '21

Ethical? You mean sustainable? And I'm not even sure that word would work since pearl harvesting is done without harming the animal.

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u/ImaBananaPie_ May 13 '21

Idk how oysters work but that looks painful

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u/LeviPorton May 13 '21

... Ah yes, let's not kill the clams, that'd be unethical... Let's torture them instead.

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u/ste_lar May 13 '21

Can we discuss the Ethics of this

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u/objeteh May 13 '21

“Ethical”